Posted tagged ‘community’

The Heart of Punk City!

2017/05/31

Heart of the City Music and Arts Festival is a free event held in Central Edmonton every June. 2017 is the 14th year of the festival, happening June 3rd and 4th in Giovanni Caboto Park (95 street and 109A avenue in McCauley).

Screen Shot 2017-05-29 at 11.38.57 AM

Ahead of the event celebrating grassroots creativity in Edmonton’s urban core, two acts at this year’s festival joined us on the show. Ben Freeland Writes is a historian and punk poet, and Quasar is a punk band formed in high school that’s participated in Edmonton’s punk scene ever since. This edition of The History of Punk covers punk culture far and wide, and why a grassroots festival in Edmonton is so important in a time of downtown gentrification.

Here’s the playlist!
Alien Boys (Vancouver) – “Gentrification”
Galaxy Express (Seoul) – “Jungle the Black”
Superman Is Dead 日本語 (Bali) – “Poppies Dog Anthem”
Quasar (Edmonton) – “Everybody”
Switches Band (Edmonton) – “Sauerkraut”
Propagandhi (Portage La Prairie) – “…And we thought that Nation States were a bad idea”
Quasar (Edmonton) – “Kydd”

Find out more about Heart of the City Music Festival:
www.heartcityfest.com

Ben Freeland:
www.benfreeland.ca

Quasar:
www.innerquasar.bandcamp.com

And here’s the show!

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The History of Punk Playlist #45 – 2015 FunDrive!

2015/10/03

Here’s the History of Punk Playlist on CJSR from 28 September! It was our VERY special 2015 FunDrive edition – thanks to F&M for coming into the studio, all the FunDrive volunteers, and everyone who donated to the show – YOU HELPED THE HISTORY OF PUNK RAISE $780 TO KEEP CJSR ON THE AIR!!!!

  1. The Sonics (Tacoma) – “Money”
  2. Richard Hell and the Voidoids (NYC) – “Blank Generation”
  3. Los Saicos (Lima) – “Demolición”
  4. K-Tels (Vancouver) – “I Hate Music”
  5. The Ramones (NYC) – “Judy is a Punk”
  6. Ben Disaster (Edmonton) – “I Wanna Hate You” (Live at CJSR)
  7. The Saints (Brisbane) – “Stranded”
  8. SNFU (Edmonton) – “Drunk on a Bike”
  9. F&M (Edmonton) – “We Miss the Sea” (Live in Studio)
  10. F&M (Edmonton) – “Maybe Tomorrow” (Live in Studio)
  11. F&M (Edmonton) – “Kukushka”
  12. Rebuild/Repair (Edmonton) – “Pieces, Destroyed” (Live at CJSR)
  13. Gorilla Biscuits (Edmonton) – Degradation”
  14. The Anatomy Cats (Edmonton) – “Aftermath of Apathy”
  15. Jim Nowhere (Edmonton) – “For You” (Live 2011 FunDrive Edition)
  16. Bikini Kill (Olympia) – “Rebel Girl”
  17. Cheap Wig (Montréal) – “That Witch”
  18. Nirvana (Seattle) – “Very Ape”
  19. The Avengers (San Francisco) – “The American in Me”
  20. The Vibrators (London) – “Disco in Moscow”
  21. Billy Bragg and Wilco (Mermaid Avenue) – “All You Fascists”

cjsr funDRIVE

Support the Müzewest Spring Renewal!

2015/04/12

Müzewest is a music education program based in Vancouver. And it needs your help bringing songs to students!

MuzeWest

The program puts professional musicians in schools that lost their music programs (thanks to good ol’ budget cuts), for a concert series.

As Müzewest founder Jennifer West asserts in the face of these cuts, “the way these students connect to the music in the concerts shows it is still invaluable. Students learn that there is a healthy way to express their creativity through this beloved art form. They learn to create a community around this concert experience.”

To support this initiative, Müzewest is running a online spring fundraiser. There’s only 3 days left, and money still needs to be raised! Funds go towards paying artists, transportation, and venue rental.

Over 1300 students have already enjoyed musical opportunities through this program. Help ensure it continues to do so in the future!

Find out more, and donate here! https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/muzewest-spring-renewal

piano

2015 Homelessness Marathon

2015/02/24

HM

The 2015 Homelessness Marathon takes place Wednesday February 25 from 2PM MST to Thursday February 26 at 5AM MST and airs across Canada. Hosted by CRFC 101.9FM in Kingston, 14 community and campus radio stations will produce 15 straight hours of programming all tackling homelessness issues.

For all you night owls, Edmonton’s CJSR is contributing stories from 1-2AM MST. The hour focuses on two major issues – the impact of gentrification in the downtown area on the inner-city community, and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Edmonton and the rest of Canada. It will include interviews with the University of Alberta’s Jay Scherer, MacEwan University’s Michael MacDonald, as well as cultural support worker Gary Moostoos, and a number of inner-city community members.

Locally, you can tune into 88.5FM, and globally online at http://cjsr.streamon.fm/!

HM-poster

Art Creates Community

2014/04/24

Jimi Hendrix and Quincy Jones.

Two household names, right? But without two very important words, it’s likely not many people would know about either of them.

These words? Education and mentorship.

Both Hendrix and Jones grew up in the Central District of Seattle, before the Civil Rights Era. Racism might not have been as overt as it was in the South, but blacks could not work, going to school, or live outside the Central District. It was, then, a three mile square area where African-Americans lived their lives. Work was hard to find after the production boom of World War II ended, and many folks in the Central District did not just face racism, but poverty as well.

What did provide people with opportunity? Music. 

Jones and Charles
The Central District had a happenin’ music community. Youth like Quincy Jones were mentored by older musicians, such as a guy named Ray Charles, who moved to the Central District from Florida. Jones was also given the run of the music room at his school, Garfield High, by his band teacher.

Later on, Jimi Hendrix went to the same high school (remember the limits placed on African-Americans in Seattle?) and while he didn’t prosper there (not all teachers are created equal) he benefited from talented mentors just as Jones did.

These mentors, who had nothing to personally gain by teaching youth, exemplified the most positive part of community participation. The connections they made and the values they instilled had far-reaching effects – just ask anyone who saw Hendrix at Woodstock, or heck, has listened to Michael Jackson’s Thriller, which Jones produced.

Jimi in Seattle

Hendrix in Seattle, circa 1958 (www.historylink.org)

Not everyone, obviously, can expect the same success as Hendrix and Jones, but that’s not the point. The real important part is people coming together and learning from each other, and building community.

Creart

Fast-forward to present-day Edmonton, and someone who understands this is a Chilean born musician and artist, Sebastian Barrera. An incredible performer in Spanish, Portuguese, and English, Barrera is also on the board for Edmonton’s Heart of the City Music Festival. He has also created a free school of arts, called Creart Edmonton, held at Parkdale -Cromdale Community League Hall every Saturday morning from 9AM-Noon.

The community league graciously donated the space for free, so each class can be held without a charge to the students. The music teachers involved donate their time as well.  Each class starts off with an hour of vocal lessons. Then an hour in the classroom, sectioned off so beginners can learn a few chords, and more advanced students the nuances of music theory.

Sebastian

Following the theory classes, everyone comes back together for an hour of jamming. Participants can join the circle and play guitar, piano, or the drums (and likely the triangle would be ok too). Not surprisingly for Barrera, art and music go hand in hand with community development. As he asserts:

Years ago being an artist was not about fame  but was about community. I come from a country (Chile) where we have important examples of musicians who dedicated their lives to change society and that type of commitment inspires me to work hard to make a difference. In my opinion artists have a big responsibility as communicators and they should work hard to be the voice of those who don’t have the ability to express themselves, and they should be activists working toward strong social changes.

As such, Barrera’s goal is to have as many Edmontonians have this opportunity as possible. His vision is for this to  inspire more free schools of arts all over the city. “Current students will start doing classes in other communities and in that way we can spread cells around.”

guitar

The positive impact of this vision is clear, as jam participant (and CJSR volunteer) Benjamin Arkless highlights, relating that “it’s an incredible opportunity for community development and it’s truly bringing a source of happiness to my life, knowing there’s a place every week where you are welcome – at any skill level to play with other people in the community – all walks of life and ages welcome.”

Arkless goes on to say that, “Parkdale-Cromdale is a true community league that isn’t simply renting the hall out to private things but a place open freely and voluntarily run. It is active and alive. So I like that, it makes Edmonton a good place to be.”

If folks want to know how they can help, Barrera encourages them to send students (of all-ages) to Creart on Saturday mornings. and, of course, to come out themselves. Everyone is welcome to share their skills, whatever they happen to be.   

People are also welcome to join the students on the last Friday of every month at Parkdale-Cromdale Hall, for the Family Friendly Music Night.  It’s a potluck AND concert! For details on the one happening Friday April 25th, check out the Facebook event here!

There’s also an important fundraising event called “Mano a Mano con Valparaiso” happening at, you guessed it, Parkdale-Cromdale Hall on Saturday, April 26th.  It’s to raise money for Valparaiso, Barrera’s home city that was devastated by a fire a few weeks ago. There will be food, drinks and music from 4PM to 1 AM. As Barrera says, “come and help us to help others.” Click here for the Facebook event!

As for how else people can help with Creart Edmonton, Barrera suggests this great advice: “Give us space for more classes, connect us with sponsors or resources. Come to our concerts. Enjoy our facebook.”

May17 

The History of Punk, Class #21

2014/03/07

The History of Punk
Monday 10 March 7:00PM
Location: Humanities Centre 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages & All-Welcome

“Characteristics” 

In this class, we will be looking at the characteristics of punk communities. This includes the elements that shape scenes, such as geographical location,  to the local institutions that exist, such as venues. We will also examine the factors involved in  a community’s development, such as marketability and innovation.

From New York City, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Prague, Vancouver, to Edmonton, we will discuss the ebb and flow involved in a scene’s existence, and why communities eventually hit a crescendo.

CBGBs

Recording the Edmonton Music Scene

2013/02/17

The other day, my car was broken into. The thief smashed the window with a hammer, and grabbed the bag that was sitting on the passenger seat. The poor guy probably figured there was something of value in it – it was a really nice satchel, given to me by an awesome swim team when I finished coaching with them.

Unfortunately for this robber, just like the bag, its contents were really only valuable to me. It contained a couple notebooks with stuff from the History of Punk class I teach, and guest lectures I’ve done over the past couple years.

Obviously, this isn’t a big deal because I can just copy and paste all the information from Wikipedia again, where like all good academics, I plagiarized it from in the first place.

The only thing Wikipedia doesn’t have that my notebook did, however, was the information I was compiling on the Edmonton Music Community. I had a pretty good database going, with a list of local bands, record labels, activists, venues, writers…basically anything local associated with the scene that I could find.

Now it’s gone, but if there’s one thing a thief can’t steal from my car is the internet. I’ve decided that creating a record of the local community is much safer online than in my Buick. So, I’ve started a tumblr page which lists the great stuff going on here in Edmonton.

Which, by the way, looks like this from space:

Edmonton From Space

Check the Tumblr out here:

And join the Facebook group here:

Please add anything you’d like to the Facebook group…except for classifieds…there’s already lots of groups doing that really well already.