Archive for the ‘noise from the underground’ category

A Review of The Past is Unwritten!

2017/02/26

The Past is Unwritten was given a very kind review by Dr. Paula Guerra, the founder of Portugal’s Punk Archive, Keep it Simple, Make it Fast, or KISMIF.

The review is published online in OpenEdition‘s Revisita Critica de Ciências Sociais. 

Read it here: “Título da página eletrónica: The Past is Unwritten”Screen Shot 2017-02-26 at 8.25.21 PM.png

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Setting off The Flaming Lips

2012/12/26

100_1172Flaming Lip Interview, Forced Exposure, p. IFlaming Lip Interview, Forced Exposure, p. IIFlaming Lip Interview, Forced Exposure, p. III

 

Here’s an interview with The Flaming Lips in Forced Exposure, shortly after the release of their first LP.

They talk about the local Oklahoma scene, why they started a band, and what’ll happen if Sonic Youth decides to cancel playing a show with them.

 

 

 

 

“We started the band out of boredom.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I think the punk thing definitely turned us on…just play and see what happens. Just do it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We want to be the next Beatles. The Beatles better watch out because we are gonna kick their ass.”

Do-it-Yourself Dutch Punk

2012/07/03

“The New Messiah” was recorded in 1986 (or maybe ’84 or ’85) by two friends in the Netherlands. Music and background vocals, Joost Maessen. Lyrics and lead vocals, Tibor van Rooij.

It’s DIY, political, and an example of youthful self-expression. The song highlights what kids outside traditional punk centres were up to, and it also shows punk as an attitude rather than a specific sound.

Listen to it over here, on the Tumblr:
http://thepastisunwritten.tumblr.com/post/26424505052

setlist nirvana

2012/05/29

(From August 17 1990 gig at the Hollywood Palladium with Sonic Youth & STP. Originally from the fanzine Flipside)

Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

2012/01/22

Recently, a book called White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race, edited by Stephen Duncombe and Maxwell Tremblay, was released. Race has been at the forefront of debates on punk, probably before, and definitely since, Lester Bangs wrote his article “White Noise Supremacists” in the Village Voice in 1979. Reactions to White Riot reveals the diversity of opinion on race and politics in punk milieux, especially this review of the book in Maximum Rocknroll, White Riot: Another Failure.”

Discussions on punk and race instantly brings to mind not only the Clash song “White Riot,” but also the Minor Threat song “Guilty of Being White.” The song was written by Ian MacKaye, who was frustrated by being mistreated, because of the color of his skin, by black youths in the community he grew up in. Highly contentious, debate and different interpretations continue to surround the song. As the book White Riot and the reactions to it show, this contention extends to the issue of race and punk as a whole.

The thing about punk is, as D. Boon said: “punk is whatever we made it to be.” From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, punk was a melange of not only different races, but also voices, messages, outlooks and ideas. Music scenes sprung up across the United States (and parts of Canada), forming an underground network where people could raise voices differing to the status quo of the mainstream.

In the following, I try to touch on the diversity that existed in the underground punk network in the United States. It is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a taste of what was happening, and how the varying elements of that diversity mixed together.

Well, except for Diversity being an old wooden ship from the Civil War era

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YEAH! Magazine: An Alternative to the Telephone Pole

2011/08/18

Seattle. The summer of 1987. Local musician and writer Wendi Dunlap decided to start a fanzine documenting the city’s flourishing music scene. Calling it YEAH! Magazine, Dunlap intentionally focused on the bands that other publications didn’t cover, like the Squirrels and the Fastbacks.

The Internet. The summer of 2011. Wendi Dunlap starts putting up digital versions of YEAH! Magazine online, over at her fantastic blog Slumberland. Giving the ‘zine a gander opens a doorway into the history of a diverse music community – that was right on the verge of making a huge impact on popular culture. Not all the bands made it big, but they all played a part. Dunlap helps shed light on their story.

www.slumberland.org
24 Years ago this week: YEAH! Magazine
24 Years ago this week: YEAH! Magazine #3

YEAH! Magazine #1
YEAH! Magazine #2
YEAH! Magazine #3

lamenting the loss of the sound – in proven “rant” format

2011/03/26

Yesterday the Edmonton radio station 95.7 The Sound went through some ch-ch-ch-changes. Instead of playing music by local acts, they’ll now be playing Katy Perry. Instead of providing opportunities to further the careers of local musicians, they’ll now be going to shopping malls dressed in Santa costumes. Instead of the community focus being at the heart of the station, they’ll now just be another frequency transmitting music as a commodity.

The Sound, only a few months old, was already having a huge positive impact in the Edmonton music scene. That has now been replaced with more background noise for people working in cubicles. It’s just another faceless business trying to make a profit.

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