Archive for the ‘noise from the underground’ category

The History of Punk goes down the toilet!

2019/03/21

In Reykjavik, there’s an old public toilet that’s been turned into the Icelandic Punk Museum! This edition of The History of Punk started with an interview in the museum, and then got right into music from Iceland’s punk history.

Here’s the playlist:

Bubbi MorthensJón Pönkari
FræbbblarnirBíó
TaugadeildinHvítar Grafir
Purrkur PillnikkGluggagægir
Jonee JoneeHelgi Hós
MegasKrókódílamaðurinn
KamarorghestarRokk Er Betra
Án OrmaDansaðu Fíflið Þitt Dansaðu
Sonus FuturaeMyndbandið
GrafíkVideó
ÞeyrRúdolf
Q4UBöring
UtangarðsmennHírósíma
GrýlurnarBetri Er Limur En Limlestir
Tappi TíkarrassSkrið
BaraflokkurinnCatcher Coming
SpilafíflPlaying Fool
Chaplin  – Teygjutwist
VonbrigðiEkkert
BodiesLonely
Oxsmá & BubbiMe & My Baby

And here’s the show!

This edition of The History of Punk originally aired on CJSR 88.5FM 18 March 2019.

Punk and Gentrification

2018/11/12

The History of Punk recently examined the history and ongoing consequences of gentrification. Part one traced the origins of gentrification, its subsequent history, and its ongoing effects. A case study of New York City’s ABC No Rio serves as an example of resistance to gentrification, despite the removal of its physical space in 2016.

Here’s the reading list:
– Dawson Barrett. “The Direct Action Politics of U.S. Punk Collectives”. American Studies, Vol. 52, No. 2 (2013), pp-23-42.
– Ruth Glass. London: Aspects of Change. London: MacGibbon & Kee, 1964.
Jane Jacobs. The Death and Life of Great American – -Cities. New York City: Random House, 1961.
– Neil Smith. The New Urban Frontier: Gentrification and the Revanchist City. London: Routledge, 1996.

Here’s the playlist:
Malvina Reynolds – “Little Boxes”
Jonathan Richman – “New Kind of Neighborhood”
Arcade Fire – “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains)”
Pretenders – “My City was Gone”
The Kinks – “Scrapheap City”
Talking Heads (official) – “(Nothing But) Flowers”
Lou Reed – “Hold On”
Reagan Youth – “Urban Savages”
Aus Rotten – “American Ethic”
Oi Polloi (Official) – “Let’s Go!”
MDC – Millions Of Dead Cops – “Church and State (Live at CBGBs 1983)”

And here’s part 1!

Part two examined the gentrification of Seattle’s Central District. Before the USA’s Civil Rights Era, the urban core of Seattle was where African-Americans could work, live, and go to school. Nowadays, as Draze raps, “The Hood Ain’t the Same”. We also looked at how punks have reacted to gentrification in Washington DC (and how agents of gentrification in DC have reacted to punks like Ian MacKaye). Finally, we looked at the wider punk reaction to gentrification and the myth of ‘progress’.

Here’s the reading list:

-“Chapter One: ‘Hit the Road Jack:’ The Rise and Fall of Seattle’s Black Music Scene, 1945-1960s” from, “This is Not For You: The Rise and Fall of Music Milieux in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, 1950s -1990s” https://era.library.ualberta.ca/…/a5ea3770-1f0b-438c-a4b4-d…

-“For Punk Music, Gentrification Is the New Ronald Reagan” https://www.citylab.com/…/gentrification-is-the-new…/379711/

Here’s the playlist:
Corb Lund– “That’s What Keeps the Rent Down Baby”
Ray Charles – “Rockin’ Chair Blues”
Jimi Hendrix – “Machine Gun”
Draze – “The Hood Ain’t the Same”
Fugazi – “Cashout”
Jack on Fire – “Burn Down the Brixton”
Jello Biafra & D.O.A. – “That’s Progress”
Wraths – “My Home”
Sick Of It All – “District”

And here’s part 2!

Part three focused on gentrification in Vancouver and Edmonton. Edmonton’s current wave of gentrification started with the development of a publicly-funded downtown arena and entertainment district. This is an example of what Peter Moskowitz refers to as “stage 0” of gentrification, when city governments enable “corporate control of neighbourhoods” though municipal policy.

Here is the reading list:

-Peter Moskowitz, “How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood”, 2017.
-Amber Dean, “Remembering Vancouver’s Disappeared Women: Settler Colonialism and the Difficulty of Inheritance”, 2015.
-Daniel Johnson, “This Is Our Land!”: Indigenous Rhetoric and Resistance on the Northern Plains. PhD., Diss, University of Alberta, 2014.
-Dwayne Donald, “Edmonton Pentimento: Re-Reading History in the Case of the Papaschase Cree.” Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies 2, no. 1 (2004), 21-53.
-Jay Scherer, “Resisting the World-Class City: Community Opposition and the Politics of a Local Arena Development”, Sociology of Sport Journal, 2016, 33, 39-53.
-Jordan Koch, Jay Scherer, and Nicolas Holt, “Slap Shot! Sport, Masculinities, and Homelessness in the Downtown Core of a Divided Western Canadian Inner City”. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 42(4), 270-294.

Here’s the playlist:

Robin Grey – “The Hackney Gentrification Song”
Alien Boys – “Gentrification”
Paroxysm – “White Picket Fence”
audio/rocketry – “The Way Ahead”
Latcho Drom – “Shit District”
Rebuild/Repair – “Burn Edmonton to the Fucking Ground”
Rebuild/Repair – “Above Ground Cemeteries”
Chain & the Gang – “Devitalize”

And here’s part 3!
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A Review of The Past is Unwritten!

2017/02/26

The Past is Unwritten was given a very kind review by Dr. Paula Guerra, the founder of Portugal’s Punk Archive, Keep it Simple, Make it Fast, or KISMIF.

The review is published online in OpenEdition‘s Revisita Critica de Ciências Sociais. 

Read it here: “Título da página eletrónica: The Past is Unwritten”Screen Shot 2017-02-26 at 8.25.21 PM.png

Setting off The Flaming Lips

2012/12/26

100_1172Flaming Lip Interview, Forced Exposure, p. IFlaming Lip Interview, Forced Exposure, p. IIFlaming Lip Interview, Forced Exposure, p. III

 

Here’s an interview with The Flaming Lips in Forced Exposure, shortly after the release of their first LP.

They talk about the local Oklahoma scene, why they started a band, and what’ll happen if Sonic Youth decides to cancel playing a show with them.

 

 

 

 

“We started the band out of boredom.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I think the punk thing definitely turned us on…just play and see what happens. Just do it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We want to be the next Beatles. The Beatles better watch out because we are gonna kick their ass.”

Do-it-Yourself Dutch Punk

2012/07/03

“The New Messiah” was recorded in 1986 (or maybe ’84 or ’85) by two friends in the Netherlands. Music and background vocals, Joost Maessen. Lyrics and lead vocals, Tibor van Rooij.

It’s DIY, political, and an example of youthful self-expression. The song highlights what kids outside traditional punk centres were up to, and it also shows punk as an attitude rather than a specific sound.

Listen to it over here, on the Tumblr:
http://thepastisunwritten.tumblr.com/post/26424505052

setlist nirvana

2012/05/29

(From August 17 1990 gig at the Hollywood Palladium with Sonic Youth & STP. Originally from the fanzine Flipside)

Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

2012/01/22

Recently, a book called White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race, edited by Stephen Duncombe and Maxwell Tremblay, was released. Race has been at the forefront of debates on punk, probably before, and definitely since, Lester Bangs wrote his article “White Noise Supremacists” in the Village Voice in 1979. Reactions to White Riot reveals the diversity of opinion on race and politics in punk milieux, especially this review of the book in Maximum Rocknroll, White Riot: Another Failure.”

Discussions on punk and race instantly brings to mind not only the Clash song “White Riot,” but also the Minor Threat song “Guilty of Being White.” The song was written by Ian MacKaye, who was frustrated by being mistreated, because of the color of his skin, by black youths in the community he grew up in. Highly contentious, debate and different interpretations continue to surround the song. As the book White Riot and the reactions to it show, this contention extends to the issue of race and punk as a whole.

The thing about punk is, as D. Boon said: “punk is whatever we made it to be.” From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, punk was a melange of not only different races, but also voices, messages, outlooks and ideas. Music scenes sprung up across the United States (and parts of Canada), forming an underground network where people could raise voices differing to the status quo of the mainstream.

In the following, I try to touch on the diversity that existed in the underground punk network in the United States. It is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a taste of what was happening, and how the varying elements of that diversity mixed together.

Well, except for Diversity being an old wooden ship from the Civil War era

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