Archive for the ‘voices from the underground’ category

Edmonton’s Contribution to the 2018 Homelessness Marathon

2018/02/23

Every year, stations in communities across Canada share local homelessness stories for the rest of the country to hear. CJSR 88.5FM broadcast the entire marathon on February 22rd 2018, with an hour focused on issues in Edmonton.

Edmonton’s hour included three interviews. First, Alex McKie and Rylan Kafara discussed ongoing ethnographic research conducted in downtown Edmonton. The research is centred upon the effects of gentrification caused by the opening of the new publicly-funded sports arena and entertainment district. The second interview, with Cynthia Puddu and Vicki-Lynn Moses, was on the Voices from the Streets photography project. The project features photos taken by Edmonton youth experiencing homelessness. The final interview was with facilitators and participants in Underground City Edmonton, who are together creating a compilation album featuring music focused on issues related to homelessness and urban poverty. The interviewees in the third piece are Brennen Steinhauer, Deejay Cardinal, Dakoda Sawan, Mike Siek, and Taro Hashimoto.

Thanks to all the CJSR volunteers who worked on Edmonton’s contribution to the 16th NCRA Homelessness Marathon, including Joe Hartfeil, Qasim Hirani, Alexander McKie, and Rylan Kafara. And a special thanks to everyone who make the Homelessness Marathon possible for a 16th year.

Edmonton’s Contribution to 2017 Homelessness Marathon

2017/02/26

Every year, stations in communities across Canada share local homelessness issues for the rest of the country to hear. Edmonton’s CJSR 88.5FM broadcast the entire marathon over February 22rd and 23th 2017 from 4PM-5:30AM, with our local stories running from 6-8PM MST.

This year, Edmonton’s stories include interviews with Colin Mulholland and Les Danyluk, who talk about homelessness, education, and activism.

Homeward Trust’s Cindi Cunningham discusses the 2016 point in time Homeless Count.

The three other interviews focus on different communities in Edmonton. Kristy Lee talks about creating grassroots recreation and wellness activities for families in Central McDougall. Focusing on the McCauley community, Paula E. Kirman speaks about her new short film McCauley: A Caring Community examining affordable housing in Edmonton. Jan and Harry Kuperus, longtime residents of the Highlands, discuss the formation, goals, and accomplishments of the Highlands Homelessness Committee, also known as YIMBY (Yes In My Back Yard).

Thanks to all the volunteers who worked on Edmonton’s contribution to the 15th NCRA Homelessness Marathon, including Joe Hartfeil, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips, Maigan van der Giessen, and Rylan Kafara.

The 2017 Homelessness Marathon

2017/02/21

Tune in to the 2017 Homelessness Marathon Wednesday 22 February starting at 4PM MST! Every year, stations in cities across Canada take turns sharing local homelessness issues for the rest of the country to hear. Edmonton’s CJSR 88.5FM will be broadcasting the entire marathon, with our local stories running from 6-8PM MST.

This year, Edmonton’s stories include interviews with Colin Mulholland and Les Danyluk, who will talk about homelessness, education, and activism. The three other interviews focus on different communities in Edmonton. Kristy Lee talks about creating grassroots recreation and wellness activities for families in Central McDougall. Focusing on the McCauley community, Paula E. Kirman speaks about her new short film McCauley: A Caring Community examining affordable housing in Edmonton. Jan and Harry Kuperus, longtime residents of the Highlands, discuss the formation, goals, and accomplishments of the Highlands Homelessness Committee, also known as YIMBY (Yes In My Back Yard).

In between the stories, frontline worker and all-around good person Tamar Dinner will share thoughts on the interviews, homelessness, and poverty in Edmonton.

Tune in online at CJSR.com by clicking right…here.

(Or, if you’re a big fan of cutting and pasting: http://cjsr.streamon.fm)

And listen to past editions of the Homelessness Marathon:

Edmonton’s contribution to the 2016 Homelessness Marathon

Edmonton’s contribution to the 2015 Homelessness Marathon 

 

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The 2016 Homelessness Marathon

2016/02/23

Tune in to the 2016 Homelessness Marathon today from 3PM to 5AM MST! Every year, stations in cities across Canada take turns sharing local homelessness issues for the rest of the country to hear. Edmonton’s CJSR 88.5FM will be broadcasting the entire marathon, with our local stories running from 11:30PM-1AM MST.

So if you’re a night owl, you’ll hear about how the Highlands community is ensuring it is a welcoming neighborhood for the homeless. There will also be an interview with actors appearing in Boyle Street’s short film City Embers, a fictional movie about what life is like for homeless youth in Edmonton. Sam Leibel will tell you how you can support the Society for Safe Accommodations For Queer Edmonton Youth, and Marlene Orr is going to share how Ambrose Place is having a positive impact in the community!

Oh, and you can tune in online at CJSR.com by clicking right…here.

MST Homelessness Marathon poster

Billy Bragg traces Americana…to Britain

2013/11/16

Billy Bragg in The Guardian: “whisper it … but the British invented Americana”

Blues Singer Muddy Waters In The Studio

Jon Savage traces the early Cleveland Punk Scene

2013/11/16

Jon Savage in The Guardian: “Cleveland’s early punk pioneers: from cultural vacuum to creative explosion”

Pere Ubu

White Noise Inferiority

2012/12/27

As my liver knows only too well, it was recently the 10th anniversary of Joe Strummer passing on. One of his legacies was embracing immigrant culture, much to the benefit of popular music ever since.

Not everyone in the punk community saw diversity as a good thing, however. Here’s an interview from the pages of Colorblind, a Chicago fanzine dedicated to stamping out racism. It’s a window into the mindset of Ian Stuart, from the skinhead band Skrewdriver. It also shows a darker side to the punk attitude – instead of channeling anger into creating positive change, it’s an example of exclusion, isolation, and hatred.

It’s also quite sad. The 20th anniversary of  Ian Stuart’s death is next year, but it’s not likely many will be marking the day with any commemoration. I know my liver won’t be.

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Raising the Maximum Punk Age

2012/08/20

Back in the early days of punk, the kids used the age of 30 as the marker for when someone was too uncool to be part of the scene. Who would ever get that old, right?

Well, this summer, one of the most important punk institutions passed through that barrier.

Happy 30th birthday to the fanzine, Maximum Rocknroll!

Not so funny now, is it?

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Personal Expression vs. the Powerful’s Repression

2012/03/12

Personal expression takes on many forms. Got something to say? Write a song. Draw a picture. Compose a poem. Do a dance. Heck, you can even express yourself by going for a run – as proved by Kevin Bacon in the film Footloose. As everyone knows, Bacon used running and dancing to not only express himself, but to help solve his problems and save the youth in his town from the repression of Jon Lithgow. Oh, and I guess he used gymnastics too.

pick up your Sunday shoes, Kevin.

Lithgow thought he was keeping kids safe from the dangers of rock ‘n’ roll. He decided that music and dancing threatened youth, and used his authority on the Town Council to get them banned. He connected personal expression with societal ills that were a blight on respectable values, and kids’ safety. Dancing was a gateway drug to trouble.

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Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

2012/01/22

Recently, a book called White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race, edited by Stephen Duncombe and Maxwell Tremblay, was released. Race has been at the forefront of debates on punk, probably before, and definitely since, Lester Bangs wrote his article “White Noise Supremacists” in the Village Voice in 1979. Reactions to White Riot reveals the diversity of opinion on race and politics in punk milieux, especially this review of the book in Maximum Rocknroll, White Riot: Another Failure.”

Discussions on punk and race instantly brings to mind not only the Clash song “White Riot,” but also the Minor Threat song “Guilty of Being White.” The song was written by Ian MacKaye, who was frustrated by being mistreated, because of the color of his skin, by black youths in the community he grew up in. Highly contentious, debate and different interpretations continue to surround the song. As the book White Riot and the reactions to it show, this contention extends to the issue of race and punk as a whole.

The thing about punk is, as D. Boon said: “punk is whatever we made it to be.” From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, punk was a melange of not only different races, but also voices, messages, outlooks and ideas. Music scenes sprung up across the United States (and parts of Canada), forming an underground network where people could raise voices differing to the status quo of the mainstream.

In the following, I try to touch on the diversity that existed in the underground punk network in the United States. It is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a taste of what was happening, and how the varying elements of that diversity mixed together.

Well, except for Diversity being an old wooden ship from the Civil War era

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