Posted tagged ‘music’

The History of Punk Radio Show #29

2015/04/27

Here’s the History of Punk Playlist on CJSR from 27 April, when Professor David Mills visited the show!

“The Boomers

Sullivan_Beatles

Playlist

1. The Who (London) – “My Generation”
2. The Beatles (Liverpool) – “All My Loving”
3. The Beatles (Liverpool) – “She Loves You”
4. Chuck Berry (St. Louis) – “Roll Over Beethoven”
5. The Beatles (Liverpool) – “Roll Over Beethoven”
6. Buddy Holly (Lubbock) – “Words of Love”
7. The Beatles (Liverpool) – “Words of Love”
8. The Beatles (Liverpool) – “Got To Get You Into My Life”
9. The Stitch in Tyme (Toronto) – “Got To Get You Into My Life”
10. Spencer Davis Group (Birmingham) – “Somebody Help Me”
11. The British Modbeats (St Catharines) – “Somebody Help Me”
12. The King Beezz (Edmonton) – “Gloria”

Readings

“Transatlantic Blues”
“America meets the Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show”

“You Stop Listening to New Music at 33”

“Buzzz a while with…The King Beezz”
“The Unfinished Business of the Modbeats”
“The Stitch in Tyme”
“The Beatles Were Punks”

Books

Jon Savage, Teenage
Elijah Wild, How the Beatles Destroyed Rock ‘n’ Roll
John Blaney, Beatles for Sale
Bob Spitz, The Beatles
Marc Fisher, Something in the Air: Radio, Rock and the Revolution that Shaped a Generation

kbeez.parade

Art Creates Community

2014/04/24

Jimi Hendrix and Quincy Jones.

Two household names, right? But without two very important words, it’s likely not many people would know about either of them.

These words? Education and mentorship.

Both Hendrix and Jones grew up in the Central District of Seattle, before the Civil Rights Era. Racism might not have been as overt as it was in the South, but blacks could not work, going to school, or live outside the Central District. It was, then, a three mile square area where African-Americans lived their lives. Work was hard to find after the production boom of World War II ended, and many folks in the Central District did not just face racism, but poverty as well.

What did provide people with opportunity? Music. 

Jones and Charles
The Central District had a happenin’ music community. Youth like Quincy Jones were mentored by older musicians, such as a guy named Ray Charles, who moved to the Central District from Florida. Jones was also given the run of the music room at his school, Garfield High, by his band teacher.

Later on, Jimi Hendrix went to the same high school (remember the limits placed on African-Americans in Seattle?) and while he didn’t prosper there (not all teachers are created equal) he benefited from talented mentors just as Jones did.

These mentors, who had nothing to personally gain by teaching youth, exemplified the most positive part of community participation. The connections they made and the values they instilled had far-reaching effects – just ask anyone who saw Hendrix at Woodstock, or heck, has listened to Michael Jackson’s Thriller, which Jones produced.

Jimi in Seattle

Hendrix in Seattle, circa 1958 (www.historylink.org)

Not everyone, obviously, can expect the same success as Hendrix and Jones, but that’s not the point. The real important part is people coming together and learning from each other, and building community.

Creart

Fast-forward to present-day Edmonton, and someone who understands this is a Chilean born musician and artist, Sebastian Barrera. An incredible performer in Spanish, Portuguese, and English, Barrera is also on the board for Edmonton’s Heart of the City Music Festival. He has also created a free school of arts, called Creart Edmonton, held at Parkdale -Cromdale Community League Hall every Saturday morning from 9AM-Noon.

The community league graciously donated the space for free, so each class can be held without a charge to the students. The music teachers involved donate their time as well.  Each class starts off with an hour of vocal lessons. Then an hour in the classroom, sectioned off so beginners can learn a few chords, and more advanced students the nuances of music theory.

Sebastian

Following the theory classes, everyone comes back together for an hour of jamming. Participants can join the circle and play guitar, piano, or the drums (and likely the triangle would be ok too). Not surprisingly for Barrera, art and music go hand in hand with community development. As he asserts:

Years ago being an artist was not about fame  but was about community. I come from a country (Chile) where we have important examples of musicians who dedicated their lives to change society and that type of commitment inspires me to work hard to make a difference. In my opinion artists have a big responsibility as communicators and they should work hard to be the voice of those who don’t have the ability to express themselves, and they should be activists working toward strong social changes.

As such, Barrera’s goal is to have as many Edmontonians have this opportunity as possible. His vision is for this to  inspire more free schools of arts all over the city. “Current students will start doing classes in other communities and in that way we can spread cells around.”

guitar

The positive impact of this vision is clear, as jam participant (and CJSR volunteer) Benjamin Arkless highlights, relating that “it’s an incredible opportunity for community development and it’s truly bringing a source of happiness to my life, knowing there’s a place every week where you are welcome – at any skill level to play with other people in the community – all walks of life and ages welcome.”

Arkless goes on to say that, “Parkdale-Cromdale is a true community league that isn’t simply renting the hall out to private things but a place open freely and voluntarily run. It is active and alive. So I like that, it makes Edmonton a good place to be.”

If folks want to know how they can help, Barrera encourages them to send students (of all-ages) to Creart on Saturday mornings. and, of course, to come out themselves. Everyone is welcome to share their skills, whatever they happen to be.   

People are also welcome to join the students on the last Friday of every month at Parkdale-Cromdale Hall, for the Family Friendly Music Night.  It’s a potluck AND concert! For details on the one happening Friday April 25th, check out the Facebook event here!

There’s also an important fundraising event called “Mano a Mano con Valparaiso” happening at, you guessed it, Parkdale-Cromdale Hall on Saturday, April 26th.  It’s to raise money for Valparaiso, Barrera’s home city that was devastated by a fire a few weeks ago. There will be food, drinks and music from 4PM to 1 AM. As Barrera says, “come and help us to help others.” Click here for the Facebook event!

As for how else people can help with Creart Edmonton, Barrera suggests this great advice: “Give us space for more classes, connect us with sponsors or resources. Come to our concerts. Enjoy our facebook.”

May17 

Getting to Know your Edmonton Music Community

2013/02/05

In the last few weeks, I’ve had the chance to sit down and chat with some pretty rad Edmontonians. I’d like to tell you about three of them, since they’re all up to really good things in the community, and that’s cool.

I met two of ’em at an event put on by the Edmonton Public Library and the CBC. Called the Human Library, it was a chance for people to sign out human books and talk with them. It was like reading a book with lots of pictures, but EVEN BETTER.

OmarThe first guy was Omar Mouallem. You might know him from all the writing he does for little publications like Metro News, Avenue Edmonton, and the Globe and Mail. He’s also the Edmonton Public Library’s 2013 Writer in Residence. Oh, and he also raps – he has two albums out, and has performed at Nextfest and the Edmonton Poetry Festival.

The one thing he doesn’t do apparently, is sleep.

And, he uses his powers for the good of the community. Take this song for example:

In the near future, Mouallem will be putting on rap workshops, participating in Story Slam, and organizing other events for youth and newcomers.

In fact, this Wednesday, 6 February, he’ll put putting on “The 7 Deadly Sins of Bad Writing” at Stanley Miller Library, in the basement at 7PM. In light of him hosting an event on bad writing…I hope he never reads this.

The next guy I talked to was Stephen “Komrade” Goyette. That’s him on the left there, beside some dude who really needs a haircut:

CBC Human Library

I’d met Goyette briefly a few weeks before, at the fifth annual Hip-Hop on the Ave, which happens every year at Avenue Theatre on 118th Ave. Dozens of local artists perform in support of Santa’s Anonymous. For many, it’s their first chance to get on stage.

Goyette organized it. He also opened the doors for youth from the inner-city to attend for free. He understands how important it is to give back to the community, and to give people opportunities. His own music, and the songs he releases with his younger sibling as the Brothers Grim, reflects this. Just check this out:

His plan, Goyette says, “is to stay in the community.” He knows that’s how to really make a difference.

ButlerThe third fellow, Tyler Butler, wasn’t a human book this time around, but you can still learn a lot about what someone is up to when you’re having coffee with ’em. Butler is a folk musician who firmly believes in participating in your local music community, and lucky for Edmonton, that’s where he’s from.

Butler also understand the importance of networks, and being supported by other music communities so you can do things like, you know, tour.

As such, he’s started a new record label made up of like-minded musicians called Cabin Songs. Recently they put on a concurrent 17-city show. Taking place all over Canada, each show was locally organized.

This, you might have noticed, nicely combined the local community with the trans-local network.

Butler believes in taking the DIY ethic to the next level, or DIT. Do-It-Together. It’s community at its best.

Tonight, Tuesday February 5th, is Edmonton’s big Cabin Songs Showcase, with Nick Everett, Tyler Butler, and Mike Tod. It kicks off at the Wunderbar at 9PM.

You can also read more about the label here.

So that’s what those guys are up to. And I’m off to get more coffee.

There’s No Tim in Team: A Modest Proposal for the Political Influence of Entertainers

2012/02/27

While growing up in a country that relentlessly bombards youth with the social conditioning to be obsessed with ice hockey, it’s not surprising that I spent a large chunk of my allowance collecting hockey cards (the rest was spent, of course, on comic books and 5 cent candies). I had a lot of great ones – a card commemorating Wayne Gretzky’s “1000th point,” heck, I think I had the card of every Edmonton Oiler that was later sold off or traded for a profit at a loss to the community. Yep, I had a pretty big collection. Also, I think I have bitterness issues still resonating from the late 1980s and early 90s.

This card is tucked up under my 50 mission Cap

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this post is approved for all audiences

2011/07/20

If President Lukashenko wasn’t so busy running a dictatorship in Belarus, he might have had time to open a history book before banning songs from the radiowaves. The book he should have looked at, The Time Tipper Gore Tried to Censor Music in America, would have told him a story about politicians going after musicians’ right to freedom of speech. While it cost many artists big time cash in legal fees, all Gore and the “Parents Music Resource Center” got out of it were advisory stickers added to some album covers, and a whole lot of publicity for the bands they attacked. Plus, her husband only made it to Vice-President. They must have kicked themselves for not going for environmentalism earlier.

Anyways. Lukashenko has taken a page from the Parents Music Resource Center’s book. Hopefully it causes a grassroots Viktor Tsoi craze in the Belarus that helps topple him from power.

“Belarusian state radio bans politically sensitive songs”
“Belarus has banned the radio broadcast of several popular Russian songs with dissident undertones amid protests against the regime of the President Alexander Lukashenko, sources said today. Over the past few weeks several songs – including late Soviet-era dissident rock icon Viktor Tsoi’s famous “We Are Waiting for Change” – have disappeared from the airwaves of radio stations.”

“Viktor Tsoi’s song banned on Belarusian radio”
“Syarhei Budkin says that one cannot find a logical explanation for such a decision of the radio leadership. ‘I am convinced this ban is to become additional promotion for musicians. Such things happened before. And it was beneficial to Belarusian musicians to have an image of prohibited singers – interest of listeners grew because of that.’ As for the prohibited song by Tsoi, the expert believes that it really can become an anthem of changes in Belarus. ‘It is often heard from cars. Remarkably, there were attempts to ban it in the Soviet times as well. But after so many years it remains relevant,’ Budkin believes.”

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This was Not a Conference, Encore

2011/06/27

Do you remember 2010’s This is Not a Conference?

It was, of course, where Graduate Music Student Association (GMSA) & the History and Classics Graduate Students Association (HCGSA) at the University of Alberta (UofA) joined forces to make an even longer acronym (GMSAHCGSAUOFA) and host a combined panel as part of their respective conferences.

Well they did it again this year too:

The following videos are from a talk called “Who said you could label dissent? The Punk Attitude in Folk Music in the Twentieth Century”

Dr. Michael B. MacDonald & Rylan Kafara

And go ahead and check out other videos from the 2011 GMSA conference:

Video from Ncounters: the Audible Past, the Mutable Future 

The past IS unwritten: National Jukebox plugs listeners into the sounds of the past

2011/05/13

Recently the Library of Congress plugged in the National Jukebox, giving people with an internet connection access to its music archives.

You can give the jukebox a kick from here: http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/

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