Archive for August 2010

Building a New Scene in Seattle

2010/08/30

The early Seattle music scene was driven by the jazz community. It would help launch the career of Ray Charles, give Quincy Jones his start and influence a young Jimi Hendrix. Now the New York Times sheds some light on the contemporary jazz milieu in the city:

“Seattle, a city synonymous with alternative rock, has also been known as an incubator for talented young jazz players who leave town to develop and thrive elsewhere.

‘But the landscape has been shifting because of recent events at the university level and at joints like Cafe Racer,’ Nate Chinen writes. ‘A growing number of young musicians have been focused on building an autonomous scene, something distinctive and homegrown.'”

Read the New York Times article:
“Seattle’s Alt-Rock Hub, Purring With Jazz”

Look at the New York Times slideshow:
“Building a New Scene in Seattle”

Read my article on the Seattle music community up through the 1960s
“Seattle in the 1960s: Music, Identity, and the Struggle for Civil Rights”

The Black and Tan Club on 12 Ave and Jackson Street. First called the Alhambra, the jazz club was opened in 1922 and closed in 1966. The name Black and Tan referred to the Asian, Black, and White patrons who all happily mingled together, effectively creating a tolerant space in a racially charged era.

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Will YOU be two steps down on August 28th?

2010/08/27

Glenn Beck is going to restore honor to America on Saturday.
See what the most reputable sources for news in America think of that:

The Daily Show “I Have a Scheme”
Watch it in the USA here
Watch it the Canada here

The Cobert Report “Glenn-Livid”
Watch it in the USA here
Watch it in the Canada here

A Hendrix Castle Where Musicians Still Kiss the Sky

2010/08/26

“Just down the street from the hot dogs of Gray’s Papaya, on a row of down-market Greenwich Village shops selling used CDs and a certain kind of glass pipe, 52 West Eighth Street is easy to miss. But a small sign marks hallowed musical ground: Electric Lady Studios.

Founded by Jimi Hendrix in 1970, it was an oddity for its time. Instead of following the usual studio model — a big, impersonal box tended by buttoned-down staff engineers — it was a psychedelic lair, with curved walls, groovy multicolored lights and sci-fi erotica murals to aid the creative flow. Hendrix died less than a month after its opening party on Aug. 26, 1970.”

Read the New York Times article here

Jimi Hendrix, seated, with the engineer Eddie Kramer, behind him, and the studio manager Jim Marron in the control room of the unfinished Electric Lady Studios on June 17, 1970.

once you, were in my…rearviewmirror

2010/08/19

Here’s an article on the pullout of American forces from Iraq leading up to the deadline at the end of August. It’s heavy on the hindsight and even has its own soundtrack!

Iraq in the rear-view mirror

Read the Los Angeles Times article here

Speaking of hindsight, here’s a little speech from 19 March 2003…And a song to listen to while the speech is playing…

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is it better to burn out AND fade away?

2010/08/18

“For students entering college this fall, e-mail is too slow, phones have never had cords and Clint Eastwood brings to mind a sensitive film director, not the catchphrase “go ahead, make my day.” These are among the 75 items on this year’s Beloit College Mindset List.”

Here’s the article:

Nirvana a classic oldie? What today’s college student believes

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That Belongs in a Museum!

2010/08/17

Museum Acquires Storied Trove of Performances by Jazz Greats

“This year the National Jazz Museum in Harlem acquired the entire set of nearly 1,000 discs, made at the height of the swing era, and has begun digitizing recordings of inspired performances by Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Bunny Berigan, Harry James and others that had been thought to be lost forever…The Savory Collection also contains examples of underappreciated musicians playing at peak creative levels not heard anywhere else, putting them in a new light for music fans and scholars.”

Read the entire New York Times article by clicking here

For a shorter article from Broadwayworld.com click here

he’s so cool he was in the 27 club before it was even a club

2010/08/13

Out of all the musicians in the morbid “27 Club,” the figure perhaps the most mythologized is Robert Johnson.  On 16 August 1938 he died under mysterious circumstances – and this murky haze surrounding his death hasn’t become any clearer with time. The legends about his life and his music, however, grew strong and became immersed in the American blues musical consciousness.

Johnson is the man that supposedly sold his soul to the devil down at the crossroads. In return, the devil taught him how to play the guitar. Real bluesy like. The crossroads Johnson apparently made his Faustian bargain at was located in the Mississippi Delta.

(And as every good fiddle player knows, Faustian legends from the American south don’t always stick to the guitar.)

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