Posted tagged ‘networks’

The History of Punk Radio Show #3

2014/10/12

Here’s the History of Punk Playlist on CJSR from 6 October!

punk-poster

STATION ID- MARKY RAMONE
1. The Minutemen (San Pedro) – “This Ain’t No Picnic”
2. The Cramps (NYC) – “Mean Machine”
3. Minor Threat (Washington DC) – “Guilty of Being White”
4. The Germs (Los Angeles) – “Lexicon Devil”
5. Black Flag (Los Angeles) – “Nervous Breakdown”
6. MDC (Austin) – “John Wayne was a Fascist”
7. Mission of Burma (Boston) – “That’s When I Reach for my Revolver”
8. Pixies (Boston) – “Wave of Mutilation”
9. The Misfits (Lodi) – “All Hell Breaks Loose”
10. The Replacements (Minneapolis–Saint Paul) – “I Will Dare”
11. Hüsker Dü (Minneapolis–Saint Paul) – “Don’t Wanna Know if you are Lonely”
12. SNFU (Edmonton) – “She’s not on the Menu”
13. The Smalls (Edmonton) – “Two Pigs in a Gunny Sack”
14. The Dishrags (Vancouver) – “I Don’t Love You”
STATION ID – NARDWUAR
15. DOA (Vancouver) – “Kill, Kill, This is Pop”
16. The Subhumans (Vancouver) – “Death to the Sickoids”

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The History of Punk, Class #19

2014/01/26

The History of Punk
Monday 3 February 7:30PM
Location: Humanities Centre 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages & All-Welcome

“Fanzines” 

MRR

Fanzines were publications that sprung out of local music scenes to engage and document the community. In the days before websites, blogs, and social media, they also served to connect participants of various local scenes with each other, and issues that concerned all of them.

Created and published by a scene’s actual participants, fanzines were a direct link to the music, ideas and debates that emerged within the community. Thus, they offered unique insights and showcased the relationship between participants as they negotiated with the various characteristics shaping the milieu.

In this seminar, we will examine different fanzines from throughout the punk network, and discuss the role they played in their particular scene. We will also look at fanzines that had a reach outside their local community and the impact this had in terms of developing a network of communication outside the mainstream.

In addition, we will discuss the a fanzine as an historical source.

Readings:
Fanzines
Punk Fanzines
Mark Perry gives birth to fanzine culture
Maximum Rocknroll Archive
Punk Planet
Raising the Maximum Punk Age
The Kids Are Alright
Czech Scene Report – Maximum Rocknroll #42 November 1986
Marchetto, Tune in, Turn On, Go Punk
“Radio Free Lithuania” Flagpole Magazine

Playlist:
Mark Perry talks about Sniffin’ Glue Fanzine
1980 BBC documentary about Guttersnipe Punk Fanzine
We Are The Writing On The Wall
NOFX – “I’m Telling Tim”
Guttermouth – “Baker’s Dozen” 

AT 44

2012 Festival of Ideas: The Importance of Music Communities

2012/10/24

On Wednesday, 24 October, I’m helping launch the University of Alberta’s 2012 Festival of Ideas at Edmonton City Hall. It’s free and open to the public, and runs from Noon-1:00PM:

Here’s what my talk is about:

When it comes to research, my interest lies in the relationship between music and society. The best way to do this is to study music communities. So, in this presentation, I’m talking about 3 different scenes from Seattle history, and each can tell us something about the past. Seattle was far removed for the traditional music centres in the United States – cities like New York, or Los Angeles. But that didn’t stop the kids living there. Youths making music can spark big change in culture – and kids participating in music communities allows them opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have.

Take a kid named James for example. He grew up in the Seattle ghetto in the 1950s. At this time, Seattle was still inherently racist – blacks couldn’t live outside the Central District, a section of town only a few square miles wide. They couldn’t work outside of it either, or go to school. It was an amazing music community though. Folks might not have had good jobs, but that didn’t stop them from playing jazz, the blues, or R’n’B. And despite the intolerance, it was still part of a network that spanned the entire continent. Locals were exposed to some of the greatest musicians in the world.

Now James, at first he couldn’t afford a guitar – so he played a broomstick. When he finally saved enough money to buy one, he was taught by the other players in the community – the ones who had nothing to lose by passing along their knowledge. This kid James? He’s better known as Jimi Hendrix!

Have you heard of the Baby-Boomers? They’ve probably made sure you have! If not, chat with your grandparents. They’re the HUGE generation that came of age in the 1960s. When it came to music in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, these youths went out and did it themselves. They created a successful teen dance network throughout the region, where everyone participated by attending the shows. They had FUN. Friendly rivalries between bands meant that if a band’s members went to the same school as you, you had to get out there and show your support. As the Baby-Boomers grew up, they moved out of the community halls and went on to dominate mainstream culture.

When the next generation was coming of age, the Baby-Boomers didn’t pass control of mainstream culture over to their descendants. Instead, they held on to it. This meant the next generation, Generation X, had to create an alternative to the mainstream. They were a small generation, and didn’t have the same opportunities of their predecessors. So, they worked on a shift underground. The foundation of this was personal expression. In music communities across North America, participants developed their own cultural institutions, and  throughout the 1980s built a stronger and stronger network. This all culminated with the Seattle music scene, and the band Nirvana – whose song “Smells Like Teen Spirit” finally brought the cultural spotlight onto a generation. If you don’t know Nirvana you might recognize the name Dave Grohl, who went on to form the Foo-Fighters. Also, you might be hearing “Smells Like Teen Spirit” a lot in the near future, since it’s the name of a sitcom being created by the writer of Big Bang Theory.

The 3 examples from Seattle show that youth create change by participating in music communities. And each shift meant this was no longer their parent’s music. For Jimi Hendrix, it was helping him overcome a life of poverty. For the Baby-Boomers, it asserting cultural dominance, and having fun doing it. For Generation X, it was speaking out against the status-quo and doing something different.

It might just be for themselves, or it might spark ideas that impact the whole world. If you have different ideas, your local music community can do the same for you. For example, in Edmonton, there’s record labels, music venues, and magazines. The only thing a local scene doesn’t have is an excuse NOT to participate. So go get your ideas out there!

 

The History of Punk, Class #11

2012/10/13

The Edmonton Free School
Sunday October 14 1:30PM
Location: Humanities 1-14, The University of Alberta (enter Humanities through south door)
All-Ages, All-Welcome

“The Edmonton Punk Scene”

Music scenes in Canadian cities like Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver get lots of attention. But as everyone in Edmonton knows, there’s lots going on here too. We’ll trace the connections bands like SNFU had with the wider punk network in the 1980s. We’ll look at contemporary bands too, as well as venues, radio shows, and other musical institutions.

Also, local punk rocker David Gault will be presenting a video he made about a song written by Ben Sir from Worst Days Down. After that, we’ll plan out our first punk homework assignment, where everyone picks an Edmonton punk band to do a short presentation on for next class. Don’t worrk, everybody already got an A.

Playlist:
SNFU – “Cannibal Cafe”
The Smalls – “Dan Diddle A Na”
Ben Disaster – “Where the Night Goes Darkest”
Zero Cool – “We’re Not Fugazi” 

Raising the Maximum Punk Age

2012/08/20

Back in the early days of punk, the kids used the age of 30 as the marker for when someone was too uncool to be part of the scene. Who would ever get that old, right?

Well, this summer, one of the most important punk institutions passed through that barrier.

Happy 30th birthday to the fanzine, Maximum Rocknroll!

Not so funny now, is it?

(more…)

The History of Punk, Class #3

2012/05/23

The Edmonton Free School
Saturday 26 May 1:30PM
Location: Humanities 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages, All-Welcome

“The Underground Punk Network”

By following the DIY ethic, the alternative music milieu in North America created a vast network that spanned the continent and operated outside the mainstream music industry. We will examine the bands, scene participants, and institutions that turned a few scattered, fledgling communities into a viable cultural force.

Readings:
Music Scenes, pp. 1-10
Tune in, Turn On, Go Punk, pp. 42-52.
We’ve got the Neutron Bomb, pp. 53-56
All Over But the Shouting, pp. 78-85
Our Band Could Be Your Life, pp. 131-133
Gimme Something Better, pp. 185-206
On the Road to Nirvana, pp. 23-30

Playlist:
The Runaways – “Cherry Bomb” 
The Decline of Western Civilization Part 1(The Germs)
Germs – “What we do is Secret”
The Replacements – “Kids Don’t Follow”
Hüsker Dü – “Eight Miles High”
Minutemen “Ain’t no Picnic” 
Black Flag – “Six Pack”
Bad Brains – “Banned in DC” Live at CBGB 1982
Minor Threat – “Minor Threat”
MDC – “John Wayne was a Nazi”
Butthole Surfers – “Cough Syrup”
Mission of Burma – “That’s When I Reach for my Revolver”
The Pixies – “Hey” Live 1988
U-MEN – “They”
Sonic Youth – “Teenage Riot”
Fugazi – “Waiting Room” 

this IS for you…to read.

2012/04/03

Here’e a link to my MA thesis, This is Not For You: The Rise and Fall of Music Milieux in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, 1950s -1990s.