Posted tagged ‘The Clash’

“Art = the Clash = Politics” The Clash play Edmonton, 29 June 1982

2015/06/29

Today in 1982, The Clash performed in Edmonton at the Kinsmen Fieldhouse. CJSR volunteers contributing to the station’s fanzine, Airtight, were there to cover the show.

Airtight August 82 Cover

An interview with Paul Simonon and Kosmo Vinyl:

AT August 1982 p.1

A review by Marc Coulavin:

AT August 1982 p.4

And another review by none other than Marcus Aurelius!

AT August 1982 p. 5

Top 5 songs to play for someone attending a white pride rally

2012/03/23

I’ve never met a white supremacist, or at least a vocal one, but I’ve often thought about what I’d say to them if I did. I figured maybe – as a favor of one Caucasian to another – I could help debunk all their racists myths. You know, show them the holes in the articulate arguments used to support their hatred, such as the profound statement: “deyy toooke arrrrr jeeeeeeeebbbbs!”

And we ain't talkin' about Steve here.

Yep, getting into a socio-economic-political-and-other-hyphenated-words discussion was one option, but I have friends that have tried that and had their lives threatened, so I thought I’d maybe go with a more indirect approach. You know, just play them some songs and let them think about stuff for themselves.

So, if you are trying to get through to someone that is down on their luck, maybe blaming personal misfortune on others, directing their potential towards bad instead of good, or just a racist jerk – this might help. And if you live in Edmonton, now might be a good time to do this since there is a white pride rally planned for this Saturday.

These songs can be played in any order, but I’ve strategically arranged them for maximum impact:

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“Kony 2012:” Our Generation’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit?” Or is that still around the corner?

2012/03/08

Yesterday afternoon, I watched a 30 minute video. You’ve probably heard of it. It was slick, pressed all necessary emotional buttons, focused on an important topic, and carried a clear message. Since it also utilized all the right social media innovations, it was clear the video was going to go viral. It even said it would. Participation in the video event was based simply upon sharing it. By nightfall, it seemed like everyone with a computer had watched and passed it along. By morning, debate had polarized over what its popularity showed about an entire generation.

I’m not going to add anything to that discussion here, but what I am going to bring up is the other thing that is clearly on everyone’s mind: the music industry.

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Joe Strummer is spinning in his grave: Billy Bragg on Why Music Needs to Get Political Again

2011/08/24

Billy Bragg recently wrote an article for the NME on the need for alternative commentary in the wake of the rioting in London. The full version of the piece is up on his website and can also be found below.

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the future is still unwritten

2010/12/26

This is Tom Morello‘s recent article on the lasting impact of the Clash, and the late and legendary Joe Strummer:

Joe Strummer, 1952-2002

The Clash Legacy

by Tom Morello

I had the good fortune to see the Clash play at the Aragon Ballroom in Chicago when I was a teenager. It was an experience that changed my life. Even before the first note was played the transformation began. I bought a t-shirt in the lobby. I was used to buying heavy metal t-shirts with lots of garish wizards and dragons on them, but this Clash shirt was different. It just had a few small words written over the heart. It said, “the future is unwritten.”

Forget the labels, but don’t forget Ari Up

2010/10/22

Blast from the past: “The Slits are an all-girl band featuring a 14-year old singer called Arianna who stamped and screamed into a tantrum as the equipment made rude noises. This was at their world debut, opening for The Clash at Harlesden’s Colosseum…Noisy, aggressive, and trashy, but lotsa fun.!” (Kris Needs, “And the Best of the Rest…” New York Rocker 1977)

Ari Up passed away 21 October at age 48. The band that she formed when she was 14 years old, the Slits, “are known to many as an all-female punk band, such as the Clash is not known primarily as an all-male punk band.” (my italics, Rombes, 2009)

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