Posted tagged ‘subversion’

disaffecting & seditious, were these the 1st punks?

2012/12/08

First Punks

The History of Punk, Class #7

2012/06/19

The Edmonton Free School
Saturday 23 June 1:30PM
Location: Humanities 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages, All-Welcome

“Not All Quiet on the Western Front: Punk in Eastern Europe during the Cold War”

During the Cold War, Western music had subversive implications for Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. In this seminar, we will examine what happened when the punk got through the Iron Curtain. Specifically, we will look at Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and the USSR. We will also look at what happened when the Eastern Bloc variants of punk traveled to the West.

Just like last week, we’ll start with a short lecture, and then transition into our intellectual picnic format – so bring food to share if you can!

Readings:
Tomáš Pospíšil, “Making Music as a Political Act: or how the Velvet Underground Influenced the Velvet Revolution”
“Hungary Scene Report” Maximum Rocknroll #39
“Hungary Scene Report” Part II
Czech Scene Report – Maximum Rocknroll #42 November 1986
“Radio Free Lithuania” Flagpole Magazine
Dropping the Iron Curtain
“Personal Expression vs. the Powerful’s Repression”

Playlist:
The story of The Plastic People of the Universe
Plastic People of the Universe – ‘Podivuhodný Mandarin”
Plastic People of the Universe – “Slavná nemesis”
DOA – “General Strike”
Beats of Freedom Trailer
Dezerter – “Szara Rzeczywistość”
Bix – Saves Neapgausi


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Personal Expression vs. the Powerful’s Repression

2012/03/12

Personal expression takes on many forms. Got something to say? Write a song. Draw a picture. Compose a poem. Do a dance. Heck, you can even express yourself by going for a run – as proved by Kevin Bacon in the film Footloose. As everyone knows, Bacon used running and dancing to not only express himself, but to help solve his problems and save the youth in his town from the repression of Jon Lithgow. Oh, and I guess he used gymnastics too.

pick up your Sunday shoes, Kevin.

Lithgow thought he was keeping kids safe from the dangers of rock ‘n’ roll. He decided that music and dancing threatened youth, and used his authority on the Town Council to get them banned. He connected personal expression with societal ills that were a blight on respectable values, and kids’ safety. Dancing was a gateway drug to trouble.

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“Somebody needs to figure out a new way to smash a guitar”

2011/08/04

it’s been a while

In the 1950s, we had beatniks and rebels without a cause.
In the 1960s, we had mods and hippies.
In the 1970s, we had glam rockers and punks.
In the 1980s,  we had metal and…other stuff.
In the 1990s, we had flannel and more flannel.

not just for lumberjacks

Then starting in the 2000s, we had…everybody dressing up like their favorite character from the last fifty years. The fashion became the passion, and folks with no connection to the subculture those styles came from regurgitated rather than invented something of their own. Often, these styles drew from music communities that formed around a particular grievance or attitude, – a relationship that can be symbolized by, say, reggae music and dreadlocks. Of course, the foundation for both of those was Rastafarianism, and anybody that knows anything about that branch of Christianity knows how stupid an affluent white person with dreads is. Or at least they should be stupid for not being informed on their stylistic choice, but nowadays there’s no meaning behind the styles – the superficial is all that matters.

This may be the reason why I’m still wearing the same clothes I had in high school.
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Who Said YOU Could Label Dissent?

2011/03/05

On Tuesday, 8 March 2011- Dr. Michael MacDonald and I will be giving a public lecture at the University of Alberta. As you can see on the poster, it’s called “Listening to Dissent: The Sound of Protest from Woody Guthrie to Rage Against the Machine.”

The talk is going to deal with the role of music in protest – and I don’t know if you’ve being reading the papers lately, but there’s been a heck of a lot of dissent against authority going on recently. So if you’re in the neighborhood, stop on by Tory 1-125 for a discussion on the attitude that musicians from Woody Guthrie to Joe Strummer to Joey Keithley to Tom Morello share.

Oh yeah, and there’ll be snacks!

With a Rebel Yell

2010/12/15

Power of the people: The Velvet Revolution

Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter that likes to write a lot.

He was in Eastern Europe when the Iron Curtain was crumbling.

And if you go to Lafayette Park, in front of the White House, tomorrow morning (Dec 16 2010) at 10:00AM you’ll see him and others promoting the importance of civil disobedience.

Here’s his article on the role rebellion held in ridding Eastern Europe of communist control, and why he thinks efforts of subversion are just as vital today: 

Every Act of Rebellion Helps Tear Down Our Corrupt System