Posted tagged ‘social movements’

The History of Punk, Class #16

2013/11/17

The Edmonton Free School
Monday November 18th 7:00PM
Location: Humanities Centre 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages & All-Welcome

“Let’s find a new way to smash a guitar” 

smashing

Punk has long been connected with politics and activism. Reacting against mainstream values has taken on many different forms – from style of dress, to song lyrics, to organizing protests.

In this class, we will trace punk’s role in engaging youth with social movements. We will also examine whether or not punk continues to be a relevant form of protest in the West, like it is in other parts of the world.

Finally, we will extend the discussion to include other faucets of youth culture – what is the broader relationship between music and politics for the millennial generation, and what ways are they rallying against injustice and authority?

Readings:
“Somebody needs to figure out a new way to smash a guitar”
“Personal Expression vs. the Powerful’s Repression”
“Pussy Riot’s plight is only one example of mistreatment by authorities”
“Why Music Needs to get Political Again”
“Past-tense Pop”
“Punk spoke up for angry kids. Why won’t today’s bands follow suit?”
“Frank Turner’s (a)political stance is part of a post-ideological culture”
“At least youth protest culture is not stuck in the 80s, like its critics”
“The Many Sides to Nowhere”
Vote for Joe!
“White Noise Inferiority”

Playlist:
The Clash – “Know Your Rights”
The Stranglers – “No More Heroes”
The Smiths – “Shakespeare’s Sister”
Dropkick Murphys – “Take ‘Em Down”
The Offspring “Kill the President”
“Punk Band Pussy Riot Protests in Cathedral of Christ the Saviour”

first-punks

The History of Punk, Class #14

2013/01/22

The Edmonton Free School
Sunday January 27th  1:30PM
Location: Roast Coffeehouse (10359 104 Street NW)
All-Ages & All-Welcome

“Idle No More” 

Idle No More

Idle No More is bringing all kinds of  issues, opinions, and feelings to the surface in Canada.  In this seminar, we’ll discuss the movement’s  tactics, aims, and portrayal in the media. We’ll also debate its success in communicating grievances, and how its message is resonating with mainstream society.

And if we’re lucky, we’ll help dispel some myths, and place what’s happening now in the wider history of social movements.

UofA PhD Candidate Daniel Johnson will be there to speak and discuss the movement as well.

Please RSVP to rkafara@ualberta.ca if you plan on attending, so we know how many seats to save.

Readings:
‎”The music strikes up as regularly as at a political meeting.” Edmonton Bulletin report on ceremony at the flats, 1882.
Martin Luther King on “The White Moderate”
Alcatraz is Not an Island”
You say you want a revolution: Soundtracks for Change in American Protest Movements”
“Idle No More is Not Just an ‘Indian Thing'”
Storify’d: Welcome to #Ottawapiskat
Justice minister’s blockade rhetoric risks inflaming public passions
Racism, hunger and laziness: A First Nations youth perspective on Idle No More media coverage
Red Deer Radio DJ Responds to Idle No More
“Daniel Johnson’s Twitter Feed”
“Idle No More – Priscilla Settee and Sheelah McLean”
Idle No More Art: Posters Promote A Revolution
Idle No More: Canadian musicians throw their support behind the movement
“Idle No More album unites Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists”
“How Idle No More Could Help Save Canadian Democracy”

Playlist:
Propagandi  – “Oka Everywhere”
“Idle No More – Round Dance Flash Mob at WEM in Edmonton”
“Idle No More – Songs for Life, Volume I”
“Idle No More Mix”
Drezus – “Red Winter”
Crystal Shawanda – “Not Without A Fight”
Boogey The Beat ft. Charlie Fettah, Wab Kinew, Young Kidd – “Idle No More”
Brother Ali – “Letter to my Countrymen”
Nathan Cunningham – “Warriors”
Blue Rodeo – “Fools Like You”
P
aul Kelly – “From Little Things Big Things Grow”
Shy-Anne – “The Awakening”

Feel free to add to the “Readings” and “Playlist” by leaving a comment below.

Idle No More

Idle No More Rally

Idle No More Sun

Idle No More B&W

Occupy Playlist

2012/01/10

So way back in mid-October of last year, I wrote a post on the role of music in social movements. At the time, it really seemed like musicians were going to be participating in the Occupy Movement, and I reckoned it would be good to show the tradition of music being used in earlier protests, activism, dissent, revolutions, and other words I looked up in my thesaurus.

Although it seemed like music was going to be a big part of Occupy, I was still a little worried things would turn out like they did after the United States shocked and awed Iraq – namely, that not much new protest music would appear. Sure old regulars like Pearl Jam wrote songs and spoke out against the war at concerts, but by and large protest music stayed out of the mainstream discourse – and those musicians that did use their voices, like the Dixie Chicks, suffered an immediate backlash for not being patriotic. Sure, punk bands that had been writing protest songs for years continued to write new ones that questioned America’s involvement in the Middle East…but there was a stark lack of new voices, ideas, and numbers.

Eddie Vedder’s favorite president AND shirt

When it came to Occupy, however, my worries were quickly quashed. Musicians old and new, mainstream and underground, Capricorns and Pisces, all started to get involved at the grassroots level – playing in Occupy camps where there was literally no barriers between audience and performer. Here’s a few examples of music, participation, and voices being heard:

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You say you want a revolution: Soundtracks for Change in American Protest Movements

2011/10/14

Recently, Tom Morello gave an interview with Keith Obermann on the Occupy movement that has sprung up in the United States, Canada, and across the Atlantic. The musician behind the Nightwatchman and guitarist for Rage Against the Machine spoke of the importance of music and culture in political change, saying that in America, “every successful, progressive, radical or revolutionary movement this country has ever seen has had a great soundtrack.”

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