Posted tagged ‘rock’

In Defense of Nickelback or: How I learned to stop worrying about having credibility

2012/01/24

When I started this blog, if someone had asked me what the last thing I’d ever write on here would be, I’d have quickly answered: “a post defending Nickelback.” Then the question-asker and I would have had a good laugh, do an awesome high-five and a jagerbomb, compliment each other on our great new haircuts, and then go back to talking about some obscure indie band that neither of us had actually heard of, but pretended to out of fear of being judged as less than cutting edge by the other.

The other thing I never wanted to do with this blog was write a run-on sentence with too many commas. As you can see, I’ve already done that. Now, here I go with the whole defending Nickelback thing. Of course, I understand if that means you’ll stop reading this post at the end of this sentence…

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Top 5 Tragically Hip Songs to Teach a Canadian History Class with

2011/02/04

As every good Canadian knows, there’s three important ingredients necessary for retaining citizenship in the Great White North:

1) A love for ice hockey
2) A love for snow
3) A love for Tim Horton & his coffee
4) A love for the Tragically Hip

Okay, so that’s 4, but as you notice, math isn’t on the list. And that last ingredient, a love for Gord Downie and the gang in the Tragically Hip, may be what really separates us from our freedom loving friends south of the CAN/AM border. Cause I’ve been there before, and there’s lots of people there that like coffee, snow, and hockey, but have never heard of the song “New Orleans is Sinking” – and New Orleans is in America, for pete’s sake!

HIP.jpeg

Important Historical Sources

So I thought that in light of this, if I were ever to teach a course on Canadian history, the best and most accessible way to do it would be in Tragically Hip song form.

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Transmissions from the Punk Heart

2011/02/02

When the music scene in Seattle exploded in late 1991, bands from everywhichwhereplace rushed to the Pacific Northwest to try and get in on the buzz. This wasn’t how things usually went. Normally, a musician had to leave the Emerald City in order to make it big. Heck, even Jimi Hendrix had to do a reversal of “follow the yellow brick road.”

Example of a brilliant scientist

Here’s some other examples of people that had to ditch Seattle to order to find “success.” I put success in quotations because it can be a pretty subjective term, and the following musicians certainly achieved different levels of it.  Of course, the examples given will then be combined into a trifector (trifecta?), because science has proven that’s the best way to make an overall argument. Thanks in advance, science.

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punk’s passionate heart

2010/12/18

Compare, if you will, the following two songs:

The Ramones, “Judy is a Punk” 1974

Talking Heads, “Psycho Killer” 1975

Boy, each band sure does have sonic uniqueness. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t both punk.

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