Posted tagged ‘recording’

Les Paul was a Pirate?

2012/03/06

(via WFMU, who got it via Modern Mechanix)

London Bridge is…opening its doors

2011/05/03

London Bridge Studio in Seattle. It’s where bands like Mother Love Bone, Pearl Jam, Blind Melon, Alice in Chains, and Soundgarden all went calling to record. And now, it’s opened its doors to tours:

Visit with one of our engineers and see where the iconic 90′s records were recorded. See the small vocal booth where Eddie Vedder, Layne Staley, Andrew Wood, Chris Cornell and Shannon Hoon all recorded their epic vocal takes. Hang out in the lounge where these bands spent weeks on end living while recording. View the Wall of Fame (wall of gold records) and the Wall of Shame (wall of scraps left behind by bands). See the autographed drum heads and LBS guest book.

Looks like another research trip to Seattle might be in order.

More information on the tour here.

And here’s the London Bridge Studio website.

Short of Able proves that winning takes time

2011/04/28

These days, a lot of importance is put on “the instant.” For inst…example, Twitter gives you instant access to Charlie Sheen. Facebook gives you up-to-date status updates from that kid you went to junior high school with…Even though you didn’t really like him and haven’t talked to him in about ten years. And of course, you’ve also got the instant music celebrities – and all that really takes is singing a song about the order the days of the week come in.

It’s getting rather rare to see musicians take their time, but that’s exactly what the gang from Short of Able have done. Their new album, Far Away and Out of Sight, was written and recorded over a ten month period. Coincidentally, it has ten songs. Just by using basic math, it is evident this LP wasn’t done in a hurry; the band was taking their time to do things right, and to learn.

Short of Able

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Here Comes the Sun, part II

2010/12/19

You know, you’re right to say that Sam Phillips sure recorded a lot of good black and white artists down in Memphis in the 1950s.

The Fantastic Four

BUT – how the heck did he do it? What happened to musicians having to go to major music industry centres like Los Angeles or New York to get a start on their recording careers? For example, didn’t Ray Charles have to leave Seattle in just 1950 for California to get going on what would eventually culminate in Jamie Foxx getting famous and Kayne West shamelessly ripping him off?

The thing of it was, there were big changes to recording technology following World War II. And when an innovator like Sam Phillips came along to seize on untapped talent that was the Memphis region’s musicians, well, the rest is history.

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Here Comes the Sun, part I

2010/12/19

You know, you’re right to say that Sam Phillips recorded white guys like Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and some upstart named Elvis (I can’t remember his last name).

BUT – he had his hand in recording black cats too. B.B. King for one, and here’s another:


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A Hendrix Castle Where Musicians Still Kiss the Sky

2010/08/26

“Just down the street from the hot dogs of Gray’s Papaya, on a row of down-market Greenwich Village shops selling used CDs and a certain kind of glass pipe, 52 West Eighth Street is easy to miss. But a small sign marks hallowed musical ground: Electric Lady Studios.

Founded by Jimi Hendrix in 1970, it was an oddity for its time. Instead of following the usual studio model — a big, impersonal box tended by buttoned-down staff engineers — it was a psychedelic lair, with curved walls, groovy multicolored lights and sci-fi erotica murals to aid the creative flow. Hendrix died less than a month after its opening party on Aug. 26, 1970.”

Read the New York Times article here

Jimi Hendrix, seated, with the engineer Eddie Kramer, behind him, and the studio manager Jim Marron in the control room of the unfinished Electric Lady Studios on June 17, 1970.