Posted tagged ‘music scenes’

The History of Punk Radio Show #6

2014/11/22

Here’s the History of Punk Playlist on CJSR from 27 October!

STATION ID – ELVIS COSTELLO
1. The Modern Lovers (Natick) – “Pablo Picasso”
2. The Sonics (Tacoma) – “Psycho”
3. Death (Detroit) – “Keep on Knocking”
4. Rocket from the Tombs (Cleveland) – “Ain’t it Fun”
5. The Clash (London) – “Clampdown” (Live)
6. The Ramones (NYC) – “Sheena is a Punk Rocker” (Live)
7. Sex Pistols (London) – “No Feelings” (Live)
8. The Replacements (Minneapolis–Saint Paul) –”Let it Be”
9. Mission of Burma (Boston) – “Academy Fight Song”
10. The Minutemen (San Pedro) – “Maybe Partying Will Help”
11. SS Decontrol (Boston) – “Boiling Point”
12. Fugazi (Washington DC) – “Waiting Room”
13. The Smalls (Edmonton) – “True Narcissist”
STATION ID – THE WEAKERTHANS
14. The Evaporators (Vancouver) – “What if I Care About the People Who Live in the Seas Around Me?”
15. DOA (Vancouver) – “Burn it Down”
16. The Offspring (Huntington Beach) – “Tehran”

offspring MRR

The History of Punk Radio Show #5

2014/11/03

Here’s the History of Punk Playlist on CJSR from 20 October!

STATION ID – PROPAGANDI
1. Nomeansno (Victoria) – “Oh Canaduh”
2. Rude Norton (Vancouver) – “Sea Cruise”
3. The Shades (Vancouver) – “New Clientele”
4. Tim Ray and the Druts (Vancouver) – “Dying in Brooklyn”
5. Tim Ray and A.V. (Vancouver) – “Quarter to Eight”
6. Active Dog (Vancouver) – “Nothing Holding You”
7. Exxotone (Vancouver) – “Sideways”
8. The Modernettes (Vancouver) – “Rebel Kind”
9. The Modernettes (Vancouver) – “I can only give you Everything”
10. The Subhumans (Vancouver) – “The Scheme”
11. The Subhumans (Vancouver) – “Urban Guerillas”
12. DOA (Vancouver) – “Trial by Media”
13. Dead Kennedys (San Francisco) – “Kill the Poor” (live)
14. SNFU (Edmonton) – “Money Matters”
15. Systematik (Vancouver) – “Regrets”

hardcorps

The History of Punk Radio Show #4

2014/10/14

Here’s the History of Punk Playlist on CJSR from 13 October!

STATION ID – WESLEY WILLIS
1. Andrew W.K. (Palo Alto) – “Oh Canaduh”
2. The Evaporators (Vancouver) – “The Bomb’s in my Pants!”
3. K-Tels (Vancouver) – “Automan”
4. Pointed Sticks (Vancouver) – “The Marching Song”
5. The Dishrags (Vancouver/Victoria) – “Bullshit”
6. Exxotone (Vancouver) – “Big Shot”
7. Active Dog (Vancouver) – “Fun While it Lasts”
8. No Fun (Vancouver) – “Mindless Aggression”
9. Private School (Vancouver) – “Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio”
10. Wasted Lives (Vancouver) – “Wirehead”
11. The Modernettes (Vancouver) – “Barbra”
12. The Modernettes (Vancouver) – “Suicide Club”
13. DOA (Vancouver) – “DOA”
14. The Fartz (Seattle) – “Take a Stand Against the Klan”
15. The Subhumans (Vancouver) – “Slave to my Dick”
16. DOA (Vancouver) – “Smash the State”
17. Art Bergmann (Vancouver) – “Company Store”

rock_against_radiation

2012 Festival of Ideas: The Importance of Music Communities

2012/10/24

On Wednesday, 24 October, I’m helping launch the University of Alberta’s 2012 Festival of Ideas at Edmonton City Hall. It’s free and open to the public, and runs from Noon-1:00PM:

Here’s what my talk is about:

When it comes to research, my interest lies in the relationship between music and society. The best way to do this is to study music communities. So, in this presentation, I’m talking about 3 different scenes from Seattle history, and each can tell us something about the past. Seattle was far removed for the traditional music centres in the United States – cities like New York, or Los Angeles. But that didn’t stop the kids living there. Youths making music can spark big change in culture – and kids participating in music communities allows them opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have.

Take a kid named James for example. He grew up in the Seattle ghetto in the 1950s. At this time, Seattle was still inherently racist – blacks couldn’t live outside the Central District, a section of town only a few square miles wide. They couldn’t work outside of it either, or go to school. It was an amazing music community though. Folks might not have had good jobs, but that didn’t stop them from playing jazz, the blues, or R’n’B. And despite the intolerance, it was still part of a network that spanned the entire continent. Locals were exposed to some of the greatest musicians in the world.

Now James, at first he couldn’t afford a guitar – so he played a broomstick. When he finally saved enough money to buy one, he was taught by the other players in the community – the ones who had nothing to lose by passing along their knowledge. This kid James? He’s better known as Jimi Hendrix!

Have you heard of the Baby-Boomers? They’ve probably made sure you have! If not, chat with your grandparents. They’re the HUGE generation that came of age in the 1960s. When it came to music in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, these youths went out and did it themselves. They created a successful teen dance network throughout the region, where everyone participated by attending the shows. They had FUN. Friendly rivalries between bands meant that if a band’s members went to the same school as you, you had to get out there and show your support. As the Baby-Boomers grew up, they moved out of the community halls and went on to dominate mainstream culture.

When the next generation was coming of age, the Baby-Boomers didn’t pass control of mainstream culture over to their descendants. Instead, they held on to it. This meant the next generation, Generation X, had to create an alternative to the mainstream. They were a small generation, and didn’t have the same opportunities of their predecessors. So, they worked on a shift underground. The foundation of this was personal expression. In music communities across North America, participants developed their own cultural institutions, and  throughout the 1980s built a stronger and stronger network. This all culminated with the Seattle music scene, and the band Nirvana – whose song “Smells Like Teen Spirit” finally brought the cultural spotlight onto a generation. If you don’t know Nirvana you might recognize the name Dave Grohl, who went on to form the Foo-Fighters. Also, you might be hearing “Smells Like Teen Spirit” a lot in the near future, since it’s the name of a sitcom being created by the writer of Big Bang Theory.

The 3 examples from Seattle show that youth create change by participating in music communities. And each shift meant this was no longer their parent’s music. For Jimi Hendrix, it was helping him overcome a life of poverty. For the Baby-Boomers, it asserting cultural dominance, and having fun doing it. For Generation X, it was speaking out against the status-quo and doing something different.

It might just be for themselves, or it might spark ideas that impact the whole world. If you have different ideas, your local music community can do the same for you. For example, in Edmonton, there’s record labels, music venues, and magazines. The only thing a local scene doesn’t have is an excuse NOT to participate. So go get your ideas out there!

 

The History of Punk, Class #3

2012/05/23

The Edmonton Free School
Saturday 26 May 1:30PM
Location: Humanities 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages, All-Welcome

“The Underground Punk Network”

By following the DIY ethic, the alternative music milieu in North America created a vast network that spanned the continent and operated outside the mainstream music industry. We will examine the bands, scene participants, and institutions that turned a few scattered, fledgling communities into a viable cultural force.

Readings:
Music Scenes, pp. 1-10
Tune in, Turn On, Go Punk, pp. 42-52.
We’ve got the Neutron Bomb, pp. 53-56
All Over But the Shouting, pp. 78-85
Our Band Could Be Your Life, pp. 131-133
Gimme Something Better, pp. 185-206
On the Road to Nirvana, pp. 23-30

Playlist:
The Runaways – “Cherry Bomb” 
The Decline of Western Civilization Part 1(The Germs)
Germs – “What we do is Secret”
The Replacements – “Kids Don’t Follow”
Hüsker Dü – “Eight Miles High”
Minutemen “Ain’t no Picnic” 
Black Flag – “Six Pack”
Bad Brains – “Banned in DC” Live at CBGB 1982
Minor Threat – “Minor Threat”
MDC – “John Wayne was a Nazi”
Butthole Surfers – “Cough Syrup”
Mission of Burma – “That’s When I Reach for my Revolver”
The Pixies – “Hey” Live 1988
U-MEN – “They”
Sonic Youth – “Teenage Riot”
Fugazi – “Waiting Room” 

this IS for you…to read.

2012/04/03

Here’e a link to my MA thesis, This is Not For You: The Rise and Fall of Music Milieux in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, 1950s -1990s.

Edmonton is my Jam

2012/03/05

Say, have you heard about the new website, This is my Jam?

Don’t pull a Ron Burgundy and be fooled by the question mark I added in – it actually has a very descriptive name. All you have to do is join the site, pick a song you want to tell people about – and it becomes “your jam” for up to a week. Then you pick a new one. Since I’m lucky enough to have friends with their fingers on the pulse of stuff that’s hip, I found out about the site and started jammin’ about a month ago.

A very good, yet different kind, of jam.

Now that I’m getting the hang of it, I’ve decided all my new jams will have something in common: they’ll all be by bands from Edmonton. There’s so much cool stuff going on in the music scene here, it would be a silly shame not to showcase some of the songs, and use alliteration whenever possible.

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F&M wear their hearts on their album sleeve

2010/11/16

When people finish graduate work in history, they usually get a job at a university…or a library…or heck,  they could just write a blog. But every so often, or at least this once – a history graduate will use the topic of their thesis to help inform their own songwriting and performing. It helps, of course, when the subject of your thesis was a Soviet rockstar.

It’s New Album Release Day again, and F&M are back with a new album today called Sincerely, F&M. I know what you’re wondering and yes – it comes with its very own winelist.

I sat down in Internetland with F&M frontlady (and history graduate) Rebecca Anderson to ask her about the new album, touring across Canada, and a guy that she learned about back in the USSR.

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Choose Your Own Wool on Wolves Adventure!

2010/11/09

To begin, please sing the following words to the tune of “Sweet Jane” by the Velvet Underground.

Tom, he is a family man, and Kevin…he’s a Jack of all Trades. Brody, he’s a really good question, and Gord, he’s a geophysi…cist. Huh. Eric, well he’s satisfied…and, you know, overprescribed…

[skip a few bars of the song here]

…and when they come home from work…

…They’re Wool on Wolves. And they’ve got a new album out. Today. Tuesday 9 November 2010. Oh, and if you haven’t already – you can stop singing the song now, cheers.

I sat down with Wool on Wolves in the real world to ask ’em about what it’s like being part of the Edmonton music milieu, finding a fine balance, and of course…what they like about music… 

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All Over but the Reading

2010/07/27

The Replacements: All Over but the Shouting by Jim Walsh. 2007. Voyageur Press. $14.99 US $ 8.99 UK $18.99 CAN.

This book is a great oral history account of the Replacements’ “career.”

Comprised mostly of recent interviews conducted by the author, the narrative also includes old quotes from band members and material straight out of the archives of newspapers, magazines and fanzines. And of course the odd comment from the likes of Bob Dylan and Greil Marcus.

The book gives a lot of insight into the Minneapolis music scene and the wider American underground milieu of the 1980s, from the people who were actually there.
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