Posted tagged ‘music communities’

Kids’ Festival of Ideas – What’s Up with the U?

2012/11/17

FREE EVENT

Saturday November 17th, 2-3 p.m. at Enterprise Square 10230 Jasper Ave, Edmonton

“Older children can join four outstanding UAlberta graduate students who will share the excitement of their current research and discoveries. Come and hear about some of the fascinating and important research currently underway at UAlberta. What’s up with the U? will present research in into drug use/abuse, tropical ecosystems, “intelligent” bacteria in our guts, and the cultural story of Seattle’s punk rock scene.”
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“Somebody needs to figure out a new way to smash a guitar”

2011/08/04

it’s been a while

In the 1950s, we had beatniks and rebels without a cause.
In the 1960s, we had mods and hippies.
In the 1970s, we had glam rockers and punks.
In the 1980s,  we had metal and…other stuff.
In the 1990s, we had flannel and more flannel.

not just for lumberjacks

Then starting in the 2000s, we had…everybody dressing up like their favorite character from the last fifty years. The fashion became the passion, and folks with no connection to the subculture those styles came from regurgitated rather than invented something of their own. Often, these styles drew from music communities that formed around a particular grievance or attitude, – a relationship that can be symbolized by, say, reggae music and dreadlocks. Of course, the foundation for both of those was Rastafarianism, and anybody that knows anything about that branch of Christianity knows how stupid an affluent white person with dreads is. Or at least they should be stupid for not being informed on their stylistic choice, but nowadays there’s no meaning behind the styles – the superficial is all that matters.

This may be the reason why I’m still wearing the same clothes I had in high school.
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Transmissions from the Punk Heart

2011/02/02

When the music scene in Seattle exploded in late 1991, bands from everywhichwhereplace rushed to the Pacific Northwest to try and get in on the buzz. This wasn’t how things usually went. Normally, a musician had to leave the Emerald City in order to make it big. Heck, even Jimi Hendrix had to do a reversal of “follow the yellow brick road.”

Example of a brilliant scientist

Here’s some other examples of people that had to ditch Seattle to order to find “success.” I put success in quotations because it can be a pretty subjective term, and the following musicians certainly achieved different levels of it.  Of course, the examples given will then be combined into a trifector (trifecta?), because science has proven that’s the best way to make an overall argument. Thanks in advance, science.

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After the Goldrush, the August Arrival

2010/10/27

Before you read any further go look at a globe. First, lock your eyes on the world’s belt, the equator. Now, look up – waaaayyy up. Past Drugwarland. Past Canada’s Bow-tie and into America’s Hat. Keep going up – a little left…wait…no, don’t go all the way into Alaska…you don’t have the eyesight necessary to see the Russians coming…ok stop! Look around, you should be in the Yukon, in or near the city of Whitehorse.

If you aren’t in Whitehorse, sorry I think you’re lost – but don’t worry cause somebody should find you before the abominable snowman does. If you are in Whitehorse, you’re in luck because the place seems to have quite the thriving music milieu. I sat down in Internetland with members of the band the August Arrival to find out more about the music, people, and of course the weather in the Great White North.

The story of the August Arrival began in the usual, normal way bands get together: In a tent.  

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