Posted tagged ‘Kurt Cobain’

The History of Punk, Class #23

2014/04/07

The History of Punk
Monday 7 April 7:00PM
Location: Humanities Centre 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages & All-Welcome

“Kurdt”

Kurdt

One day in the summer of 1983, a band called The Melvins  put on an impromptu event called The Them Festival in Montesano, Washington. This was near a place called Aberdeen, a town of 17,000 people 108 miles from Seattle. The ‘festival’ consisted of a free performance in the parking lot of a Thriftway supermarket. A teenager from Aberdeen was in the audience, and later wrote in his journal that “the stoners were bored and kept shouting, ‘Play some Def Leppard,'” but this was “what [he had] been looking for.”

In this class, we’ll take a look at the legacy of this teenager, Kurt Cobain, who felt isolated in his hometown – from mainstream society, other youth, and his family. We will trace his participation throughout the underground music community in Washington, from Aberdeen to Olympia to Seattle, while examining his influences and values.

Finally, we will discuss Cobain’s lasting impact 20 years after his death, and why he still resonates with a generation that found what it had been looking for, in Nirvana.

Readings:
“Nirvana Photographer Charles Peterson Reflects On Kurt Cobain’s Life & Legacy”
“Notes from Seattle: 20 years later, what is Kurt Cobain’s legacy?”
“Kurt Cobain’s overlooked legacy: Guitar teacher for a generation”
“Kurt Cobain’s hometown no ‘nirvana’ 20 years after death”
“Here We Are Now”
“Kurt Cobain, Seattle 1993 Complete Interview”
“Kurt Cobain’s Interrogation of Hegemonic Masculinity”

Playlist:
The Melvins – “live-in-the-studio, circa 1984
Beat Happening – “Our Secret”
The Go Team- “Scratch It Out”
The Go Team – “Bikini Twilight”
Nirvana – “Smells like Teen Spirit” (first time live)
Nirvana – “Live at Reading, 1992” (full concert)

upside down

is it better to burn out AND fade away?

2010/08/18

“For students entering college this fall, e-mail is too slow, phones have never had cords and Clint Eastwood brings to mind a sensitive film director, not the catchphrase “go ahead, make my day.” These are among the 75 items on this year’s Beloit College Mindset List.”

Here’s the article:

Nirvana a classic oldie? What today’s college student believes

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All Over but the Reading

2010/07/27

The Replacements: All Over but the Shouting by Jim Walsh. 2007. Voyageur Press. $14.99 US $ 8.99 UK $18.99 CAN.

This book is a great oral history account of the Replacements’ “career.”

Comprised mostly of recent interviews conducted by the author, the narrative also includes old quotes from band members and material straight out of the archives of newspapers, magazines and fanzines. And of course the odd comment from the likes of Bob Dylan and Greil Marcus.

The book gives a lot of insight into the Minneapolis music scene and the wider American underground milieu of the 1980s, from the people who were actually there.
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That Tom-Tom Club bought all the Wack Slacks, Fuzz, Plats and Kickers!

2010/07/06

Way back in 19 and 92, just over a year after Nirvana’s Nevermind was released – “Grunge” was declared a “Success Story” in the New York Times. The article was aptly titled… “Grunge: A Success Story.”

Written by Rick Marin and published on 15 November 1992, the feature story on the style and fashion of grunge  traces its beginnings as “a five-letter word meaning dirt, filth, [and] trash” all the way to Seventh Avenue in New York City where it became the focus of Marc Jacobs’ “spring Perry Ellis collection.”

Hence, the “success” can be explained by this mathematical formula:

expensive fashion designer + good-looking models + other people cashing in = SUCCESS

MarcJacobs Grunge

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I’m just selling albums, I’m not selling out

2010/04/06

“I used to like that band, but then they totally sold out.”

Everybody has heard someone say this (less than) insightful statement, I’m sure I’ve said it at least 100 times myself.  When somebody says this the are usually attempt to make at least one of these points clear:

1) They are super rad and liked that band before you’d heard of them and
2) Now that the band is popular, they have no street cred and their music and message isn’t worth anything. The band just didn’t abide by the principles that the person speaking attests to.

Well, the truth is – people that say this are pretentious, yes, but they are also idiots (in my case, I’m just a more self-aware idiot).. AND they have mostly no understanding of the band or the type of music that they are speaking about. Mostly.

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