Posted tagged ‘hardcore’

Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

2012/01/22

Recently, a book called White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race, edited by Stephen Duncombe and Maxwell Tremblay, was released. Race has been at the forefront of debates on punk, probably before, and definitely since, Lester Bangs wrote his article “White Noise Supremacists” in the Village Voice in 1979. Reactions to White Riot reveals the diversity of opinion on race and politics in punk milieux, especially this review of the book in Maximum Rocknroll, White Riot: Another Failure.”

Discussions on punk and race instantly brings to mind not only the Clash song “White Riot,” but also the Minor Threat song “Guilty of Being White.” The song was written by Ian MacKaye, who was frustrated by being mistreated, because of the color of his skin, by black youths in the community he grew up in. Highly contentious, debate and different interpretations continue to surround the song. As the book White Riot and the reactions to it show, this contention extends to the issue of race and punk as a whole.

The thing about punk is, as D. Boon said: “punk is whatever we made it to be.” From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, punk was a melange of not only different races, but also voices, messages, outlooks and ideas. Music scenes sprung up across the United States (and parts of Canada), forming an underground network where people could raise voices differing to the status quo of the mainstream.

In the following, I try to touch on the diversity that existed in the underground punk network in the United States. It is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a taste of what was happening, and how the varying elements of that diversity mixed together.

Well, except for Diversity being an old wooden ship from the Civil War era

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Transmissions from the Punk Heart

2011/02/02

When the music scene in Seattle exploded in late 1991, bands from everywhichwhereplace rushed to the Pacific Northwest to try and get in on the buzz. This wasn’t how things usually went. Normally, a musician had to leave the Emerald City in order to make it big. Heck, even Jimi Hendrix had to do a reversal of “follow the yellow brick road.”

Example of a brilliant scientist

Here’s some other examples of people that had to ditch Seattle to order to find “success.” I put success in quotations because it can be a pretty subjective term, and the following musicians certainly achieved different levels of it.  Of course, the examples given will then be combined into a trifector (trifecta?), because science has proven that’s the best way to make an overall argument. Thanks in advance, science.

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1st world problems getting you down?

2010/07/30

Is your allowance not high enough?

The car your parents bought you not quite flashy enough?

The clothes you were given for a new school term just not trendy enough?

You were asked to take out the garbage TWICE in order to get the new iphone?

Wow, sounds like you need a holiday!

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All Over but the Reading

2010/07/27

The Replacements: All Over but the Shouting by Jim Walsh. 2007. Voyageur Press. $14.99 US $ 8.99 UK $18.99 CAN.

This book is a great oral history account of the Replacements’ “career.”

Comprised mostly of recent interviews conducted by the author, the narrative also includes old quotes from band members and material straight out of the archives of newspapers, magazines and fanzines. And of course the odd comment from the likes of Bob Dylan and Greil Marcus.

The book gives a lot of insight into the Minneapolis music scene and the wider American underground milieu of the 1980s, from the people who were actually there.
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the 27 Club ain’t no picnic

2010/07/27

So like I was saying before, not every musician that died at age 27 went out with a glamorous bang.

Mia Zapata was murdered.

and D. Boon was killed in an automobile accident.

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