Posted tagged ‘Gay Rights’

The History of Punk, Class #6

2012/06/14

The Edmonton Free School
Saturday 16 June 1:30PM
Location: Humanities 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages, All-Welcome

“Racism, Gender, & White Male Punk Privilege”

The punk movement is often generalized as largely male, white, and straight. Such a view, however, excludes many participants. This seminar will examine Riot Grrrl feminism, Homocore, and scene members that didn’t fit the typical stereotype.

This week we will be starting with a short lecture, and then moving outside to discuss things in our usual intellectual picnic format. Bring food to share if you can!

*Following the class, we will have a podcast lecture from Dr. Lucy Robinson, The University of Sussex, posted online.

Readings:
Lester Bangs – “The White Noise Supremacists”
Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America
Kurt Cobain’s Interrogation of Hegemonic Masculinity
Gimmie Something Better, pp. 409-419
Grunge is Dead, pp. 303-314
Top 5 songs to play for someone attending a white pride rally
Joining the 27 Club isn’t all that it’s cracked up to be

Playlist:
The Replacements – “Androgynous”
Pansy Division – “Groovy Underwear”
NOFX – “Jamaica’s Alright if you like Homophobes”
Propagandhi – “the only good fascist is a very dead fascist”
Nirvana – “Been a Son”
Bikini Kill – “Double Dare Ya”
7 Year Bitch – “The Scratch”
The Gits – “Insecurities”
The Offspring – “Cool to Hate” 

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Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

2012/01/22

Recently, a book called White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race, edited by Stephen Duncombe and Maxwell Tremblay, was released. Race has been at the forefront of debates on punk, probably before, and definitely since, Lester Bangs wrote his article “White Noise Supremacists” in the Village Voice in 1979. Reactions to White Riot reveals the diversity of opinion on race and politics in punk milieux, especially this review of the book in Maximum Rocknroll, White Riot: Another Failure.”

Discussions on punk and race instantly brings to mind not only the Clash song “White Riot,” but also the Minor Threat song “Guilty of Being White.” The song was written by Ian MacKaye, who was frustrated by being mistreated, because of the color of his skin, by black youths in the community he grew up in. Highly contentious, debate and different interpretations continue to surround the song. As the book White Riot and the reactions to it show, this contention extends to the issue of race and punk as a whole.

The thing about punk is, as D. Boon said: “punk is whatever we made it to be.” From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, punk was a melange of not only different races, but also voices, messages, outlooks and ideas. Music scenes sprung up across the United States (and parts of Canada), forming an underground network where people could raise voices differing to the status quo of the mainstream.

In the following, I try to touch on the diversity that existed in the underground punk network in the United States. It is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a taste of what was happening, and how the varying elements of that diversity mixed together.

Well, except for Diversity being an old wooden ship from the Civil War era

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