Posted tagged ‘anarchy’

2012/09/18

Here’s a phone interview I did for Sound + Noise over the weekend on recent dissent and repression in the Pacific Northwest.

Sound + Noise

In the wake of the recent hearings of  Leah-Lynn Plante and Matt Duran, Sound+Noise has been working with academics and activists to bring this act of government-sponsored political oppression into the scrutiny of the public arena.

It needs to be said, now, that these two individuals are non-violent political activists who have had their basic human rights and freedoms violated by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigations. They have each been brought before a Grand Jury (a secret judicial body that privately determines the need to apply formal charges, without the aid or presence of a defense attorney) and now face jail time.

In order to better understand the climate around this issue, Sound+Noise Editor Sam Maroney recently spoke with recent MA History graduate at the UofA Rylan Kafara.

Rylan Kafara is the founder of a blog called The Past Is Unwritten, and teaches a class on the history of punk with the Edmonton…

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The History of Punk, Class #4

2012/05/30

The Edmonton Free School
Saturday 2 June 1:30PM
Location: Humanities 1-14, The University of Alberta
All-Ages, All-Welcome

“Punk and Politics Picnic” 

The alternative community was a magnet for radical beliefs, on all sides of the political spectrum. This seminar will look at issues such as the Cold War, Environmentalism, Women’s Rights, and the power of the state.

This week we’ll be having class outside. A punk rock picnic!

Vegetarianism has become a tenet of many punk rock participants, so try and bring something to share that fits that theme of not being meat.

Readings:
Dave Grohl: ’80s Hardcore
Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

Playlist:
Dead Kennedys – California Über Alles
Jello Biafra is running for Mayor?
Yup, Jello Biafra ran for Mayor”
The Ramones – “Bonzo goes to Bitburg”
The Clash – “Louie Louie”
Black Flag – “Louie Louie”
Iggy Pop – “Louie Louie”
The Offspring – “Tehran”
The Offspring – “I’m not the one”
The Offspring – “LAPD”

Ian MacKaye – straight edge & vegetarianism
Ian Mackaye talks politics, protest and profit
Ian Mackaye testifies against an all ages ban
Jello Biafra on Oprah with Tipper Gore
Henry Rollins Teeing Off – Defenders of Free Speech
NOFX – “Franco Un-American”
Joey Keithley at Occupy Ottawa

Not Just White Noise Supremacy: The Diversity of the Underground Punk Network in late 1970s-early 1990s America

2012/01/22

Recently, a book called White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race, edited by Stephen Duncombe and Maxwell Tremblay, was released. Race has been at the forefront of debates on punk, probably before, and definitely since, Lester Bangs wrote his article “White Noise Supremacists” in the Village Voice in 1979. Reactions to White Riot reveals the diversity of opinion on race and politics in punk milieux, especially this review of the book in Maximum Rocknroll, White Riot: Another Failure.”

Discussions on punk and race instantly brings to mind not only the Clash song “White Riot,” but also the Minor Threat song “Guilty of Being White.” The song was written by Ian MacKaye, who was frustrated by being mistreated, because of the color of his skin, by black youths in the community he grew up in. Highly contentious, debate and different interpretations continue to surround the song. As the book White Riot and the reactions to it show, this contention extends to the issue of race and punk as a whole.

The thing about punk is, as D. Boon said: “punk is whatever we made it to be.” From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, punk was a melange of not only different races, but also voices, messages, outlooks and ideas. Music scenes sprung up across the United States (and parts of Canada), forming an underground network where people could raise voices differing to the status quo of the mainstream.

In the following, I try to touch on the diversity that existed in the underground punk network in the United States. It is by no means comprehensive, but should provide a taste of what was happening, and how the varying elements of that diversity mixed together.

Well, except for Diversity being an old wooden ship from the Civil War era

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