Posted tagged ‘American myths’

Recycling in America

2010/11/07

Why do something new when you can just reuse what’s worked before?


he’s so cool he was in the 27 club before it was even a club

2010/08/13

Out of all the musicians in the morbid “27 Club,” the figure perhaps the most mythologized is Robert Johnson.  On 16 August 1938 he died under mysterious circumstances – and this murky haze surrounding his death hasn’t become any clearer with time. The legends about his life and his music, however, grew strong and became immersed in the American blues musical consciousness.

Johnson is the man that supposedly sold his soul to the devil down at the crossroads. In return, the devil taught him how to play the guitar. Real bluesy like. The crossroads Johnson apparently made his Faustian bargain at was located in the Mississippi Delta.

(And as every good fiddle player knows, Faustian legends from the American south don’t always stick to the guitar.)

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It’s in the Constitution…Isn’t it?

2010/07/05

Have you ever had somebody cite the United States Constitution to you as justification for something stupid they’ve said? Have you ever cited the United States Constitution as justification for something stupid you’ve said?

Well don’t worry because everyone has done it. Here’s a handy website for next time, where you’ll find:

1) The US Constitution

2) Things that are not in the US Constitution

…and the Onion walked off to look for America

2010/06/28

This week, America’s most trustworthy news source, the Onion, presents “the Patriotic Issue: News Only Visible to Real Americans.”

Try clicking on the link if you aren’t a real American. That’s right, it won’t work.

By delving into the archives and covering contemporary events, the good folks at the Onion really cut to the core of what being American is all about. (more…)

Cars + Freedom = America

2010/06/21

As everyone on the other side of the pond and at least a handful of people over here know, the United States recently won a football match against England in the World Cup, when the game ended in a 1-1 draw.

To celebrate the match, remind the British of America’s revolution once again, and of course sell cars, Dodge made a commercial for the 2010 Challenger that has King George III‘s redcoats facing off against George Washington and his band of motor vehicles.

The advert has it all – American folklore, the British running from Washington (and his car) in fear, and a narrator professing that “here’s a couple of things America got right – cars, and freedom.”

Every nation does it, but nobody does it better than America. I don’t mean making cars or being free, but propelling patriotism and creation myths into the national consciousness.

Some people think that such a practice hasn’t always made things work out so well for the United States. Others, like Stephen Colbert, use it as a vehicle for brilliant satire. In the case of this commercial, it just ends up being a lot of fun.*

*Yes, a lot of people probably disagree with me that it’s all in good fun. So go ahead, that’s why George Washington gave you the freedom to leave comments.