Posted tagged ‘1960s’

You say you want a revolution: Soundtracks for Change in American Protest Movements

2011/10/14

Recently, Tom Morello gave an interview with Keith Obermann on the Occupy movement that has sprung up in the United States, Canada, and across the Atlantic. The musician behind the Nightwatchman and guitarist for Rage Against the Machine spoke of the importance of music and culture in political change, saying that in America, “every successful, progressive, radical or revolutionary movement this country has ever seen has had a great soundtrack.”

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“Somebody needs to figure out a new way to smash a guitar”

2011/08/04

it’s been a while

In the 1950s, we had beatniks and rebels without a cause.
In the 1960s, we had mods and hippies.
In the 1970s, we had glam rockers and punks.
In the 1980s,  we had metal and…other stuff.
In the 1990s, we had flannel and more flannel.

not just for lumberjacks

Then starting in the 2000s, we had…everybody dressing up like their favorite character from the last fifty years. The fashion became the passion, and folks with no connection to the subculture those styles came from regurgitated rather than invented something of their own. Often, these styles drew from music communities that formed around a particular grievance or attitude, – a relationship that can be symbolized by, say, reggae music and dreadlocks. Of course, the foundation for both of those was Rastafarianism, and anybody that knows anything about that branch of Christianity knows how stupid an affluent white person with dreads is. Or at least they should be stupid for not being informed on their stylistic choice, but nowadays there’s no meaning behind the styles – the superficial is all that matters.

This may be the reason why I’m still wearing the same clothes I had in high school.
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They were different times, and good riddance

2011/04/26

March on Tuscaloosa County Courthouse, summer of '64

A spy force specializing in repression. Police beatings. Documents hidden away for decades. Wild accusations with no merit leading to harsh crackdowns.

In a land where individual freedom is supposed to be so important, it’s hard to believe that less than 50 years ago, state-sponsored activity like the above took place. Against people that simply wanted to live the American dream.

In files found in the Tuscaloosa County Sheriff’s Office just recently, that’s exactly the story that they tell. Fearful of integration and spurred on by Edgar J. Hoover’s nutball theory that the members of the Civil Rights movement were raging communists, Alabama Governor George Wallace created “the Commission to Preserve the Peace.” Robespierre would have been proud. When it came to fighting integration, the commission could basically do whatever they wanted…And they didn’t want to hand out candy.

Here’s an article from the Tuscaloosa News on the release of the documents, and what that information does to fill in some important holes in the Civil Rights Era:

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City of Love & Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties

2010/12/13

Professor Lawrence Aronsen from the University of Alberta has written a book called City of Love & Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties.

According to the good professor, it’s a book about “the Baby Boomers coming of age, trying to find their identity. The hippie thing is a nice way to counter the mass consumption of the ’50s and ’60s.”

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WikiLeaks in the 1970s

2010/12/12

Hear all about it: United States President Richard Nixon kept secret recordings of his conversations in the Oval Office. This is, of course, until the Watergate committee found out about them. Recently those tapes have been released by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, and a new batch came out last week. They shed a lot of light onto Nixon’s personality and more candid opinions on American foreign policy, Vietnam  draft dodgers, and the circumstances of Jews in the Soviet Union.

Not to mention blacks, Italians, and the drinking prowess of the Irish.  
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The Pattie Boyd Effect/Affect

2010/12/07

Yes indeed, science has its formulas. Albert Einstein came up with that one about “mass–energy equivalence” and now everybody knows that E = mc2 (well, supposedly anyways).

Then there’s Sir Issac Newton and his trifector of motion. He wrote it in Latin so I can’t understand it, but people say it’s important and I believe them ever since the time I got lost in an apple orchard.

Pattie Boyd

But it’s not very fair for science to hog all the important formulas. Music should have some too. And thanks to a gal named Pattie Boyd, it does.

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My MA thesis explained in 3 youtube videos

2010/11/12

“I think I helped wipe out the 60s”

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