Archive for December 2010

“the world touches too hard” Captain Beefheart, 1941-2010

2010/12/18

Don Van Vliet, better known as Captain Beefheart, died yesterday.

Here’s the NPR article on his life:

Remembering Captain Beefheart 

"John Peel called Beefheart a true genius"

With a Rebel Yell

2010/12/15

Power of the people: The Velvet Revolution

Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter that likes to write a lot.

He was in Eastern Europe when the Iron Curtain was crumbling.

And if you go to Lafayette Park, in front of the White House, tomorrow morning (Dec 16 2010) at 10:00AM you’ll see him and others promoting the importance of civil disobedience.

Here’s his article on the role rebellion held in ridding Eastern Europe of communist control, and why he thinks efforts of subversion are just as vital today: 

Every Act of Rebellion Helps Tear Down Our Corrupt System 

City of Love & Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties

2010/12/13

Professor Lawrence Aronsen from the University of Alberta has written a book called City of Love & Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties.

According to the good professor, it’s a book about “the Baby Boomers coming of age, trying to find their identity. The hippie thing is a nice way to counter the mass consumption of the ’50s and ’60s.”

(more…)

WikiLeaks in the 1970s

2010/12/12

Hear all about it: United States President Richard Nixon kept secret recordings of his conversations in the Oval Office. This is, of course, until the Watergate committee found out about them. Recently those tapes have been released by the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, and a new batch came out last week. They shed a lot of light onto Nixon’s personality and more candid opinions on American foreign policy, Vietnam  draft dodgers, and the circumstances of Jews in the Soviet Union.

Not to mention blacks, Italians, and the drinking prowess of the Irish.  
(more…)

The Pattie Boyd Effect/Affect

2010/12/07

Yes indeed, science has its formulas. Albert Einstein came up with that one about “mass–energy equivalence” and now everybody knows that E = mc2 (well, supposedly anyways).

Then there’s Sir Issac Newton and his trifector of motion. He wrote it in Latin so I can’t understand it, but people say it’s important and I believe them ever since the time I got lost in an apple orchard.

Pattie Boyd

But it’s not very fair for science to hog all the important formulas. Music should have some too. And thanks to a gal named Pattie Boyd, it does.

(more…)